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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so. im building up my 383 stroker. got heads, intake, carb, some other goodies.

i went to look at cranks and internals, and i found out,

if i use an original 400 crank, then i have to have the block bored and machined to take new stroke and some other things.

but if i buy a "new" 383 crank, does the block still need to have the machine work done? or is it compatible with my 350 block, while giving the 3.750 stroke still?

thanks, any advice will help.:You_Rock:
 

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Regardless of what crank you use you have to clearence the rod stroke,,, I have a stock 400 that I want to use,, but after doing research as well I am going with a Eagle kit,, its not externally balanced,, internal balance,, the 400 crank has to be reground to fit the 350 main saddles,, I reground a few of those in my machine shop days,,, the rods now with the extra stroke has to clear the block down near the oil pan rails,, and depending what rods you use and camshaft you have to clearence the rod bolts on the top as well,, that is what is nice about eagle kit,, rod bolts not a bolt & nut like OEM,, Matty man
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So the block still has to be "notched" or whatever even if I buy the kit that is already ground down to fit the main journals of the 350?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok. Thanks. And yup. I had already planned on doin so. I just Wasn't sure on what needed machining. Thanks again
 

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The stock rod bolts on a 3 3/4 stroke crank are really close to the cam lobes when they pass them, if using the 5.7 inch rods. There are "stroker rod bolts available if using stock type rods. When setting up my 406, the rod bolts were wiping the break-in lube off of the cam lobes, really close clearance, so the stroker bolts with smaller heads added some clearance there.
 

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i have done 3 of the late 1 piece rear seal 383 kits and the block still need to be clearanced.the inside case dimention is the same as the old blocks. use rods with cap screws instead of nut and bolt. if you look at a stock 400 rod you will notice one bolt is shorter than the other. the short one went to the cam side for clearance. you want at least 100 thou clearance with steel rods at a min. pre assemble it before you have it balanced to check all clearances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How do you determine a 1- piece or a 2- piece rear seal?

ive never really been sure.

i heard it depends on the year of the block..

My 350 block is a 1971 Camaro block made in L.A.
 

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1986 started the one peice,, the one peice rear main is just that,, a large 4 ich or so rear main seal,, the older is the two peice rear main seal,, 87 & up started all one peice rear seal,, your block is a two peice rear seal,, and I just checked Eagle web site and their cranks are internal balanced,, the cast OEM crank I was going to use is external balanced,, you`ll love the performance of the 383,, Matty man
 

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It's kinda too bad that the factory didn't go with a stroked 350 instead of the 400, with it's siamese cylinder arrangement, and with it's hot running reputation. The 383 seems like a great way to go......
The 400 got its reputation for running hot primarily because folks didn't drill the steam hole or drilled them incorrectly in the heads. I've never had one run any hotter than any other engine if set up properly and have an adequate radiator---but yeah the 383 is the perfect cure for those issues. It still requires a good radiator though...horsepower= heat and it has to disapated somewhere.....Dan
 

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x2 on not running hot. i have been running 400s for over 25 years and never had one that ran hot.i have had them in everything from dayly drivers to hot race motors.
 

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X2 on matching the right radiator to that High Performance 383.
Don't even think about using the original radiator it just can't cut it.

I'm running an Alumatech large dual core with dual computer controlled electric fans and temperature control is precise and response time is short.

Arnie in Iowa
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i have the radiator that came with the 350 out of the chevelle.

it was not stock, but i couldnt tell ya anything else about it.

Shall i still go with a new one? and any suggestions?
 

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I'm cooling my Caddy engine in my Elco project with a Champion 3-row aluminum radiator, from Ebay. During Cam break-in, it ran at 175 degrees, with a 180 thermostat, at 2200 RPM. It cost me $229 including shipping. Looks like it will do the job OK.
It is the biggest core that would fit in the core support, and cooled by a 7-blade fan & clutch. I always opt for the biggest radiator, since it cools the trans too. Having a hot running engine, without a separate trans cooler, isn't doing the transmission any good either.
 
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