El Camino Central Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
881 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If you own a 81 or newer El Camino you've got to have an OBD scanner to test the system. I've been using an Alltest Brainmaster on my 87 Elky and my 86 MCSS. I'm interested in finding out what other people are using for a scanner, how expensive they are, and what you think of them.

:mrgreen:
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
4,363 Posts
A paperclip! 8O
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
4,363 Posts
Really though, if I need readings I use a Snap-on MT2500. Before OBDII, I used my OTC Pathfinder 2000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
scanners

I don't use the obd computer on my 79 but I use an auto xray all the time. There in jc witney for around $300.00. I have used it at work for a few years now and decided to buy on myself. It has obd 1 (gm, ford, and chrysler) and obd 2 connections. I can print out the info on a p.c. printer or you can read it on the small screen on the scanner. It works alot better on obd2 cars but it does a real good job on obd 1's aswell. :twisted:
 
E

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Code Reader

:lol: I use one that I bought at the local Shuck's for about $35. All it says on it is GM Code Reader, and I don't think the GM stands for General Motors. It works on ECM A-B and also ABS A-H 1982 thru 1995. Just gives you the basic codes, but comes with an instruction book that helps us beginners get by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
Hi all.

I have a similar and related [but non Elky] question.

My 95 Olds Delta 88 Royale has an OBD1 sticker under the hood, and a 16 pin OBD-II type connector under the dash. It's a crossover year I'm told by the Haynes electronic engine emissions manual. Check engine light comes on and stays on. Fuel mileage is down about 20% or more so at 300 or more miles a week, I can't afford to ignore it a lot longer.

First, (as the Haynes manual says) I tried jumpering #5 and #6. No go. In my setup, there is no contact at the #6 position. The closest contacts in that area are at #5 and #8 positions. I jumped them, but no go. All it did was cycle the electric door locks. I'm leary to jump any of the other terminals, not knowing what [kind of really expensive] damage I might cause.

Second, I tried using a Super Acton (Actron?) code reader that's said to be able to read both OBD-1 and OBD-2 using different cable connectors. All I got was a "Recheck Connection" message on the display. No amount of rechecking connectors made any difference. Speaking to the tech rep at Actron, I'm using the right scanner for my application.

Here's my question:
Keeping in mind that my OBD-1 computer may not have it's connector wiring in the right (typical) place, what color are the two wires that need to be jumped in order to put the computer into diagnostic mode?

If there's not a simple technical answer to my question, where's the best website to post my question?

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
This is all interesting but it would be more interesting if i knew what you guys were talking about. I 'm no mechanic but i can get by on basic stuff. What do these scanners tell you about the car. I know newer cars can be plugged in and you can find out alot about the car but i didn't know you can do the same with older cars. I have an 87 camino and am now curios about what kind of info you can get. The prices you guys said you paid for the different units sounds worth it. Thanks for the help

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
For cars with CCC carbs I use an auto xray. I have heard though that the OBD1 cable has been discontinued so... I do need to buy another new machine that will do OBD2 and CAN.


Now for MNUNNs question.

Your delta is a hybrid year. It has an ECM that is basically an OBD2 machine but it's still OBD1. It sometimes uses OBD2 codes and has some other features of OBD2.

You should be able to read it with any OBD1 reader. I can read it with my cheapie auto xray. You just need an OBD2 cable.

The 94-95 ECMs used in the full size cars were very prone to failure. They were not built very well. I have replaced many many of them. Even on my own vehicle.

Bought a 94 le sabre from a dealer with 35K on it for 3K. You would think it was on the lot as a new car... It was around back with the trade ins cause the previous owner couldn't get it fixed at the dealer and bought another car.
I have found dealers generally don't find bad ECMs because they are afraid to replace them for a number of reasons.
What was happening was it was setting a code for the coolant over temp. Well it only did it when you started it immediatly after turning the key on. If you turned the key on and let it sit a few seconds it would work fine. (This was also told to me by two GM techs at the dealer)

When I heard that I knew exactly what the problem was. The ECM needed to warm up the chip a little before it worked correctly.

Replaced the ECM and was good for a long time. Then it started to do a no start sometimes. Well as I have learned in most cases it's a bad ECM these days. Did a quick scan and check out and replaced the ECM. Was fine again for a very long time. It failed a third time but that was related to the VATS part of the ECM.

They fail in different ways every time. It's not just mine but many of the ones that I work on. It's a reoccouring problem with those ECMs. I always keep a spare ECM in the trunk because it's not a matter of it it's a matter of when it fails again.

I'm not saying to go out and replace yours but just beware that the hybrid ones fail allot. Check the usual first.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top