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In my neighborhood,fracking is becoming quite a topic.
Signs everywhere either for or against the process.
From my time at unemployment,I've read that the average age for workers in this industry is 54 years.
Seems they are using the older,experienced,knowledgeable employees available,rather than cheap young labor (what a concept!)
I'm awaiting authorization to take some welding courses...both for the opportunities in the fracking field and for my hobbies...

Anyone else work in this field,and care to give me any hints on where the money is,career wise?
I scored quite high on my reading,and math tests,so I may get a chance to do some administrative positions rather than in the field sector.
Anyone else in the eastern Ohio area looking for a career,fracking may be a great opportunity.
 

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I don't work in that field but I sure do sell a lot of electrical material to them. I would ship a lot to a company called artic air but really didn't know who they were so I asked. It's a helicopter company that flies material out to the platforms. Down here in Calif. Chevron and Arco have refineries and they look like there ready to explode and they seen to have fires a little to often. Good for biz but I would hate to see the big one.
Good luck with your job hunting and be careful it does blow up.:nanawrench: I herd up in north or south Dakota they were drilling and the town can't build fast enough to handle all the people working in the fields it's like the old days they have camps and buses to get the workers to work. They also said they still needed about another 1300 workers it's so big and the state has a billion dollar surplus of cash. That was a few months ago and they maybe fracking there I herd that a nasty way to get down to the deep oil.
 

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NWS: POTENTIALLY RECORD BREAKING HEAT POSSIBLE THIS WEEKEND. Click for details



Mayor: North Dakota's busiest oil boom town reaping prosperity, problems with drilling frenzy


  • JAMES MacPHERSON Associated Press
  • First Posted: May 22, 2012 - 9:59 pm

  • Last Updated: May 22, 2012 - 9:57 pm


http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/3b8fae5324e5495c81a1c595571d61b8/ND--ND-Oil-Expo
BISMARCK, N.D. — Oil has brought enormous economic prosperity to the busiest city in North Dakota's booming oil patch but also has exacerbated problems in housing, infrastructure and traffic, even pushing some "stressed out" older residents to move away, Williston Mayor Ward Koeser told industry and government officials Tuesday.
Koeser said the city is experiencing exciting times and unprecedented wealth but it's far from figuring out how to survive the biggest oil rush in the nation.
"We're still in the middle of it and we're still trying to deal with it," Koeser told an audience of several hundred at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference and Expo in Bismarck.
North Dakota has risen from the nation's ninth-leading oil producing state to the nation's No.2 producer in just six years, with advanced horizontal drilling techniques in the rich Bakken shale and Three Forks formations in the western part of the state.
State statistics show a record 213 rigs were drilling in the oil patch as of Tuesday. Koeser said 90 percent of the drill rigs are piercing the prairie within 90 miles of his city.
The population in Williston has doubled in the past decade to some 30,000 residents and the average wage there has risen from about $32,000 in 2006 to about $80,000, Koeser said. More than half of Williston's residents now work in oil-related jobs, and the city's unemployment rate is at 1 percent, "which I believe is the lowest in the U.S.," he said.
There are some 3,000 unfilled jobs in the city, Koeser said.
While many cities across the nation would be envious of Williston's success, the city now holds some dubious distinctions.
Koeser said the city "hasn't been sitting on its hands" and has done its best to keep up with the explosion of activity. But the hundreds of millions of dollars in new housing construction and infrastructure improvements have failed to keep pace with the explosion of drilling activity in the area.
BISMARCK, N.D. — Williston Mayor Ward Koeser (KOH'-zur) says oil has brought enormous economic prosperity to his city but it also has come with plenty of headaches like housing shortages, heavy truck traffic and infrastructure problems.
Lynn Helms, directors of the North Dakota Oil and Gas Division, speaks at the opening day of the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, N.D. Tuesday, May 22, 2012. (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

Koeser said the city ranks No. 1 in the nation for housing shortages and rent inflation. A one bedroom apartment is fetching more than $2,300 monthly, matching or exceeding those in the nation's biggest cities.
"Rent is a huge problem, especially for senior citizens on fixed incomes, Koeser said.
Oil-related traffic is causing headaches and torn-up roads, he said.
"It's hard to imagine anywhere else in the country that deals with so many trucks," Koeser said.
Wayne Biberdorf, who was appointed in March by Gov. Jack Dalrymple as North Dakota's new "
energy impact coordinator," said he's been meeting with local officials throughout the state's oil patch listening to concerns and reporting them to the governor.
"What I learned was not unexpected," Biberdorf said. "There is a lot of stress in western North Dakota."
Williston has experienced a boom before which lasted for several years until the 1980s when it went bust. When oil development rekindled in the region in 2004, the city spent $5 million on planning studies to prepare. But no one could foresee the tsunami of oil activity that followed with the new drilling techniques that allowed oilmen to tap vast oil reserves two miles beneath the surface.
"By the time the studies were complete, they were obsolete," Koeser said.
Koeser said the city will be forever changed with the oil boom and hopefully for the better.
"We want to remain a place where people want to live," Koeser said. And "prevail as a better community than when it all started."
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I work on the engineering side of the industry. I was a rig welder for about 8 years. I got tired of the 110* and 5* weather. If it rains, you can't work. If you dont work, you don't make any money. I decided to take some more schooling and earned a total of 5 associates degrees.
I'm not the type to go to a four year school. I have no attention span if i'm not interested in what i'm supposed to be learning. Anywho, I have been designing drilling rigs since 1988 and will continue to do so.
Great working conditions, you don't have to own your own rig since the company you work for supplies everything. Depending on the software you use, the pay starts at around $30 per hour up to $80 per hour. Again, depending on software and experience. The best part.. NO UNIONS!! It takes a while to figger what it is that you like, after you do that, then you need to find the part of the country/world where you can make a good living. I moved from Tulsa to Houston and doubled my wage, doing the same thing. Good luck
 

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Yup, oilfield scum here. Had too many different job titles over the years. I'm an onshore drilling engineer now in Norway. Doubled my wage by moving here from what I was doing before I was unemployed, but also everything here costs 2x to 3x as much, and taxes are insane... So I probably will not make much money over here to bring back home.
 

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Yup, oilfield scum here. Had too many different job titles over the years. I'm an onshore drilling engineer now in Norway. Doubled my wage by moving here from what I was doing before I was unemployed, but also everything here costs 2x to 3x as much, and taxes are insane... So I probably will not make much money over here to bring back home.
Hey Vic, nice to hear from ya. Other than the overpriced everything, how is Norway? I've applied at a company that is Norwegian owned and if I get the yob, I may be working in Stavanger for a while. Another yob I applied for would be in Edinberg. Either one would be fine after the summer is over. :texas:
 

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Hey Mike! I am loving it here to be honest, it's a great place to live and work. It is much closer to being like home then you'd ever think. Weather-wise it is much better for me than my last job was in California. It was too dang hot in the Central Valley for me... which means it might be too cold here for you. But it's really not that bad, sort of like Seattle as far as the winters here go, and summers are sort of like Anchorage, so it's a decent combination.

The cost of everything is the major concern, and biggest thing I hate about it here. Taxes are also pretty insane, 35% right off the top for my income bracket, that ramps up even more once I start making more money. Finding familiar foods has not been as hard as I was lead to believe, so you will be able to get by with not much trouble if you're a typical American eater like me. Traffic can be pretty bad too, small, narrow roads with not much thought put into the layout with lots of aggressive drivers on them. There are lots of American cars here, there is a huge following for American cars and culture, much more than anyone would think.

Be sure to check out Halliburton.jobbs website at http://www.halliburton.no/newsread/index.aspx?nodeid=5110 English language is a button on top right side. You really don't need to know any English to live here, the oilfield jobs require English speakers, and pretty much everyone knows some English and can get by, which helps a lot. I am probably taking advantage of that too much, or maybe relying on it too much is a better way to put it, I really should learn some Norwegian.

Other major companies to check out if you really are interested in working over here are Statoil, ConocoPhillips, Schlumberger, Baker Hughes Inteq, etc... Actually, I guess if you can think of a major oilfield company they are probably over here in some capacity.

If you're really interested in a change of pace I think you'd like it here. :beer:
 

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Hey Mike! I am loving it here to be honest, it's a great place to live and work. It is much closer to being like home then you'd ever think. Weather-wise it is much better for me than my last job was in California. It was too dang hot in the Central Valley for me... which means it might be too cold here for you. But it's really not that bad, sort of like Seattle as far as the winters here go, and summers are sort of like Anchorage, so it's a decent combination.

The cost of everything is the major concern, and biggest thing I hate about it here. Taxes are also pretty insane, 35% right off the top for my income bracket, that ramps up even more once I start making more money. Finding familiar foods has not been as hard as I was lead to believe, so you will be able to get by with not much trouble if you're a typical American eater like me. Traffic can be pretty bad too, small, narrow roads with not much thought put into the layout with lots of aggressive drivers on them. There are lots of American cars here, there is a huge following for American cars and culture, much more than anyone would think.

Be sure to check out Halliburton.jobbs website at http://www.halliburton.no/newsread/index.aspx?nodeid=5110 English language is a button on top right side. You really don't need to know any English to live here, the oilfield jobs require English speakers, and pretty much everyone knows some English and can get by, which helps a lot. I am probably taking advantage of that too much, or maybe relying on it too much is a better way to put it, I really should learn some Norwegian.

Other major companies to check out if you really are interested in working over here are Statoil, ConocoPhillips, Schlumberger, Baker Hughes Inteq, etc... Actually, I guess if you can think of a major oilfield company they are probably over here in some capacity.

If you're really interested in a change of pace I think you'd like it here. :beer:
I thought all the Norwegian you needed to know was "yaw" and "Yaw, shore!" Hmm, I'll give Halliburton a shot. I applied at Cameron Iron Works for the sub-sea dept. designing trees and manifolds to be sreviced by ROV's. hope something comes up soon. Can you hunt ober there?
 

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Oh yah, yah, shure, shure!

Yep, I think you can hunt and fish. Some places and times of year you don't even need a license to fish. Not too sure how hunting works, think you have to take some pretty intensive hunter safety courses to be allowed to have a gun first, then I think it's pretty simple to actually go hunting though.

I have been sharing my company apartment with a guy who does I think something similar to what it sounds like you might do. I am still not 100% what this guy here does tho, lol, but he just spent a few weeks offshore doing some completions and such with trees and pipelines. Pipeline and Process Services division of Halliburton is who he is with. http://www.halliburton.com/ps/default.aspx?navid=44&pageid=5786&prodgrpid=MSE::1045781651161746
 

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If I was a young man I would definitively be working in the oil fields. If you can handle the weather and being away from home 2-3 weeks at a time any job you can find will pay well. Off shore pays better. In south Texas even the truck drivers make $100k plus. None of the school districts in south Texas can find school bus drivers anymore because they all quit to drive oil field trucks.
 
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