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Discussion Starter #1
Been thinking about one of these, I like the Mr. Gasket with the big adjustment knob (1-5 psi) but have read where they are not accurate and often leak around the knob..what do you guys use?
 

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Don't go the cheap route - try to avoid 'made in china' parts. I had a mid-range priced unit spew fuel on headers before - lucky I didn't lose my elky.

I would look at some of the brands available at JEGS and spend a little more than the MR Gasket one...

I don't use one now at all - so I'll let someone else on site make a specific recommendation on the higher end units.

Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the info...Ive never used one on any car Ive had and looking for one reliable but not high priced, Ive been running an Edelbrock 1406 carb on stock 305 since 2006, never had any problems driving but has always been hard to start hot, been told it might be trickling fuel after shut down from too much pump pressure pushing the float needle off its seat.
 

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Hey JM , I have the Holley fuel pressure regulator about $ 30 its mounted on the inner fender and works great .... be sure to use a liquid filled fuel pressure gauge you'll find in Jegs or Summitt catalogues , because those junky Mr. Gasket pressure gauge you find at the auto parts sometimes flutter up & down or go hay-wire , pure chines junk ... on my Edelb. 600 carb they say that 7 lbs. pressure is the max you want to set the regulator at foran Edelbrock carb .... Thanks the Geezer :nanawrench:
 

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x2 on the holley regulator..:texas:

Fuel Pumps and Pressure​
Avoid extremes in fuel pressure. At IDLE, there should not be any more than 6.0 psi; if the vehicle has
an adjustable fuel-pressure regulator, set it to 5.5 psi. With most fuel pumps the minimum fuel
pressure is encountered at high rpm and WOT. Fuel pressure should not drop below 2.0 psi. If it does,
a fuel pump with more capacity may be required. Note that some later model vehicles (the 5.0L Ford
is one example) have mechanical pumps that will give more than 6.0 psi at idle. The vehicle will
perform well, but may be prone to stalls on quick turns and stops with the clutch disengaged. If this
problem occurs, check the fuel pressure. If it is more than 6.0 psi at IDLE, it should be reduced
through the use of a regulator, such as Edelbrock #8190, or by creating a restricted by-pass bleed to
the fuel return line. Edelbrock Street Fuel Pumps are highly recommended for all Edelbrock Performer​
Series carburetor installations.
 

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pressure regulator

I'd most definetly cast a strong vote for a liquid filled unit. The ACCEL unit that's sitting on my moddified TPI intake is a vibrating rattletrap. Here I've got several thousand dollars into my intake system and this working, but flopping around miniature ACCEL guage. Good Luck! Nitro-Nicky
 

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Not to muddy up this thread, but the consensus seems to be that Edelbrock carbs don't like more than 5 PSI. It was mentioned a while back that the Edelbrock fuel pump was a 7 PSI pump, but their carbs wanted 5 PSI. Someone mentioned that Edelbrock addressed this issue, but I don't remember the results. I would guess that they recommended a regulator.
Looking tin the Summit catalog, I noticed that some regulators are big bucks. The price seems to be dependent upon how fast the regulator can correct pressure fluctuations. I suppose the race guys need the the good regulators more than we do, for the street.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Im going to get a gauge tomorrow and see just what the stock pump is doing. Thanks everybody :nanawrench:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This may be a dumb question, but can a regulator be placed before a filter, or should it be placed after? I currently have an in-line fuel filter between the mechanical pump and carb.
 

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Just for an extra thought and info for you, I have a full size fuel gauge that I'm able to install into one of my vehicle engine compartments (it has about a 12+ inch rubberized flexible hose attatched) and tape to the windshield to I can go through a full throttle track run and see if there's any variations in pressure. Of course this is on a EFI engine which has a mucho higher fuel pressure.
*As for the question of putting a regulator before/after a fuel filter; it's Not Even a Dumb Question. The regulator should always be placed AFTER the filter. You do not want any varience (like a slowly plugging filter) to vary your fuel pressure. If a filter is working harder over time, that's a variance. The regulator isn't a computer that thinks, therefore it isn't adjusting itself for too small of an injector or a plugging up injector/ think computerized carb / it only tells the injector to stay open 'longer'. Your Regulator is designed to prevent OVER-pressure or to allow more pressure. so if the clogging fuel filter was between the regulator and the carb, you would't know that you had dialed in 6 psi and the carb was only getting 3.75. Make sense? But if the filter was before the regulator, it would pull down the pressure and you would see the results of that visibly by the miniture pressure guage and can adjust for it.
What you can't adjust for is your fuel bowl suddenly running dry or fuel starvation from a severe cornering issue, etc But I'm definitly not a carburator guy. Hope that was descriptive enough. Nitro-Nicky
 

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“....or by creating a restricted by-pass bleed to the fuel return line……”


This is the route I took when I built my Cad powered El Camino. Although it was done mainly to have a constantly flowing fuel system to prevent vapor lock/heat soak problems, I have used them in the past to bleed off excessive pressure.

If you have the time to put one together they have a couple of advantages over the aftermarket diaphragm units. The hand full of brass fitting you need are usually under $10 and there are no diaphragm or seals to rupture and start leaking fuel (ever wonder why they sell rebuild kits for most of the “good” fuel pressure regulators they sell? .

Basically I use a short section of 1/4" brass pipe and internally thread it for a recessed 1/8” pipe plug. The pipe plug has a small hole drilled into the center (in this case 7/64” ) that bleeds off pressure and fuel into the return line that runs back to the fuel tank. While I plumbed this one directly into the carburator, it could be built using a “T” fitting and placed somewhere between the fuel pump and carburator.

Here are some pictures from when I was building it.









 

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Not to highjack a thread, but; DANG ALMIGHTY MIKE, How does your elky turn a corner at speed with Russian T-11 sitting up front?!! Arn't you about two thousand pounds lighter than the Caddy you stole that thing out of??? Does you Mom know what you did? Nitro
 

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".....How does your elky turn a corner at speed with Russian T-11 sitting up front?!! Arn't you about two thousand pounds lighter than the Caddy you stole that thing out of??? Does you Mom know what you did?....."


Actually it turns pretty good....in spite of the propaganda that a 500 Caddy only weighs 50 pouunds more than an iron head small block the truth is closer to 100 pounds. Subtract the wieght savings on an aftermarket AC system and Sanden Compressor, aluminum radiator and lighter battery and I'm close to frontend weight of a stocker. Add an F41 suspension and the jounce bars and it does OK for a truck.

And probably closer to 2500 pounds lighter than the El Dorado it came from.

Actually I think mom gave uo on me 35 years or so ago when I was stuffing V8s into Pintos and Vega's. I will be taking this back to Illinois later this month to see her though....4000 mile round trip (for the second time).

And no Nitro even though I suspect it would easily meet the criteria of what you're hunting for (to include fuel mileage) IT"S NOT FOR SALE :poke:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ordered a Summit fuel pressure gauge to check mine, meanwhile looking at regulators from Holley, Edelbrock, etc. I sure wont try the Mr. Gasket one I liked, especially after seeing this youtube clip:


 
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