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Discussion Starter #1
So i'm thinking about painting my car with the duplicolor system. I just want to see if anyone has used it, had any success, and if its possible to do it in your own garage.

How much prep did you do? sand all the way down to the metal, then prime?

Also i'm switching from two tone to solid so i've removed all the exterior trim but have a few holes from fasteners to fill and the studs from the clips to remove, what would you fill those holes with?

thanks for any help you can give!
 

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Stacey David did a segment on one of the Gearz TV episodes using the Duplicolor system with fantastic results. The secret is in the body prep work. If you have multiple layers of old paint, you should strip down to bare metal. The molding clip holes should be welded shut with a MIG welder. If you don't have access to one you can use one of the many fiberglass type products such as Kitty Hair.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i'll try to find that episode, thanks for mentioning it. also will look into kitty hair, don't have a welder
 

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If you use the kitty hair you will need to tap around the holes to lower the metal soom so you can sand the kitty hair flat with the rest of the panel. If you don't do this you will end up having high spots. Welding them would be better. Who not check around and see what a body shop would charge to do this. You could then grind the welds smooth. Then add a little filler if needed to make it nice a smooth. Then prime it.
 

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I needed paint for another project (Not my 84), and started shopping...

I just purchased 6 Quarts of Duplicolor on sale from Advance Auto Parts online for $112 With Free Shipping and $50 off next internet order from them! I'll put that toward the Clear Coat purchase. At $18 and change per pre-mixed Quart (No reducer to buy)...It's the best deal on paint I can find. With Quarts if I have some left over I can return it!

I have used this product before, and it was good quality....You are not going to hit top prize at the car show at home...But you can equal a $3000-$4000 dollar job with ease.

The finished product is All in the Prep....2 weeks of Prep and 2 hours of Spray Time is what you are looking at.

My advice is NOT to hit bare metal...Grind down into the factory color...If you hit metal "Etch" then Prime and hope it takes.

Laquor is easy to do in your garage as it dries fast, and you can Color Sand before the clear coat goes on to remove any flaws.

Make sure nothing can ignite the Laquor fumes...Washer/Dryer off...Gas Water Heater off / Compressor outside etc!

Been painting cars and bikes in my garage since the 70's...Fun Stuff...Just wish I could do Flames:dontknow:
 

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I deleted/shaved all my conquista trim and just cut off the Lil rivet heads and ground down flush to body with a cut-off tool,then aplied "metal-ready" filler,sanded and then took it to my painter(brother-in-law:nanawrench:)& let him finalize it to HIS standards.is your trim spoken for? If not pm me,as id getting together some conquista trim(mine was too far gone) for a 5th gen for the wifey.thanks and good luck.
 

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Duplicolor system

Stacey David is the bomb! Any paint job result is going to be 75% (or more) based on the prep work. When I hear someone make a remark that they can't figure out how to make the effort to get those trim holes welded, instead of some form of bondo that will fail, I automatically think they don't have what it takes to do a half way descent paint job.
Now I know that makes me sound like a jerk, but search your heart; the el camino body is a difficult body to straighten out. They came from the factory with lots of panel warps and can suck up a great deal of time, build primer, long board sanders, and sealer.
The color you want to paint influences the color choice of the primer. So know everything you want to do beforehand. Then clean the entire vehicle to a sanitation level you would want your bathroom floor to be if you had to eat a meal off of; including the engine. You'll want to wipe down the vehicle over 2-3 times with new rags in wax & grease remover.

This is how some guys can color the interior of their hot-rods with spray cans of paint and it looks professional. And there's nothing like seeing it done, it's shiny, looks better than some of the body shops produce, and you did it with your own worn out bleeding fingers! But there's no short cuts to the prep.

Don't get roped into the cheap price that this system seems to offer. You've got a whole lot of surface to cover; it'll be most likely closer to $1500 with all the materials if you don't own any of the tools or materials. Good Luck!
 

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Nitro....
I agree, a large part of the cost is your Equipment. Air compressor large enough to feed air on a constant rate above the demand of your gun...That old 2HP craftsman shop compressor is not going to keep up...

I also have a $500 Binks "Color" Gun, 2 Primer Guns (Never run Primer through your Color Gun), a Sharp Line Dryer to keep water out of the system, and a cabinet full of "Stuff" to get the job done...A few Grand later, over the years I now have a good set up...

Spend $2500 on tools and materials, then sand your fingers into early arthritus cramps, inhale lots of cancerous fumes, get overspray on everything you own, and blow your 2 weeks vacation time....Come to think of it, that Professional job is starting to make more sense:poke:
 

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I'll definitely agree on the bodywork prep being the biggest part.I'll also agree about the long rear half of the body being prone to rippling, mine looked near perfect after my 1999' paint job, but is showing some rippling again, of course I have colorsanded & buffed black paint to highlight anything.
You can do decent paintwork at home though, my front end was a late night(s) rush job under a carport,pics in photobucket. With solid colors, you can take a small break at the end of a panel to let a small compressor recover.If you want really straight bodywork , skimming the whole thing with quality filler like evercoat rage or the new Quantim product & blocksanding off what you don't need will make a big difference. Then use a good 2-k primer & block it before the duplicolor.
 

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Is duplicolor lacquer based? if it it is use a high build lacquer primer like dupont 131s or you could have wrinkling.
 

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Problems arise immediately or over long periods of time. The 2K primer will expand and contract at different rates than lacquer. It will fail just a matter of when.
 

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Thought I saw before where the (new) laquers by duplicolor were a bit different than the old stuff, maybe not. Just looked at their msds sheets,see where sherwin williams is the manufacturer.Haven't heard anything yet about lifespan in the sun either.
Just another thought about paint itself, the current dupont nason isn't bad & not too expensive. A local maaco manager may sell to you for less than a local paint supplier.
 

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Being hard on the poor guy/Duplicolor....

I have felt bad for the poor guy ever since I posted those thoughts yesterday. In person, you can rub their poor feet, buy 'em a box of squishy stuffed doughnuts custom finished by a one toothed Italian Woman to punch the hole in the center, buy them a $5 buck Late and make sad faces while wrinkling your brow deeply about how they've been wronged and end up taking each other's sisters out for breakfast after everyone's kissed and made-up.

But just over the internet, sometimes you've gotta slap leather and fire where you point that thing.

I'd only painted a few cars on my own in the garage or with a cheapo tent-fan set ep affore I tackled my first El Camino 1986 Conquesta. It's the one I'm usung in the AVATAR. It was a hopeless, worn out basket case, with that 3 tone paint of silver and gray, nothing lined up, the bed was beat and had layers of brick and tile glues and debri's all stuck on, then painted over, tailgate shot, must have had every type of rail system you could bolt to the top of the bed, inside or out. Someone had actually stuffed sawdust in the rear-end and in the transmission to quiet things down.

Then to make matters worse, I had a job with a juvinile delinquent who had been homeless all his life, was ssssssssooooooooo angry about the world, counselor, had the worst possible case of Diabetes that was eating his body in chunks. My local city hired me as a last chance attempt before turning him over to a locked physility for the rest of his life. So one day I took him out in the hills with me to go get some firewoed in my Elky. I drove us out into no-where, had him get out of the Elky, and then as I got out, I started carrying on about all these threats he'd been making to other staff, that each time he did that it costs us 1-3 hours extra of unpaid paperwork. I then mentioned to him that I thought he and I had been getting along just fine until earlier that week when I spent a number of extra hours documenting his bull****, and just what it cost me at home. Then I pulled out hunting rifle and asked him if he thought he could knock it off. Of course he said ''NO"", So I proceeded to blast the hell out of my side of the elky with 22mag ammo. For some reason that shut him up. He knew I loved that car. I was the only staff member that listened to his whinning ass, so he couldn't report it to anyone. He was the best kid after that!

JLCustoms pointed out the best of the top 5 things you'll need to do/know/apply and that''s using:
With solid colors, you can take a small break at the end of a panel to a compressor recover.If you want really straight bodywork , skimming the whole thing with quality filler like evercoat rage or the new Quantim product & blocksanding off what you don't need will make a big difference. Then use a good 2-k primer & block it.

That's an area that fails a lot of beginers on these cars, you'll need to really in the bondo to rid the pannel of those waves. That's where a power board works wonders. Better yet, find someone who runs an expert body shop. Make a deal that you will clean up his shop on a regular basis for just one hour of Inspection and direction for the next week. Then look up on the internet for the most often purchased body working/paint video's out there. DO NOT MIX INGREDIANTS FROM OTHER MANUFACTURERS. DO NOT USE OLD CHEMICALS. Clean them all each day with Prepsol. That '86 El Camino I did turned out fantastic; the Blue was an early 80's Porche that would change color's, depending on the light; from Grey to Purple. The silver had an undercoat color that allowed it it also change color in the light: bright , heavy metallic silver, that would turn a grey silver to a pearl silver. Find a cheap gun and a couple panels from the wrecking yard to pracktice spraying your gun on. I paid someone cash to set my guns up on paint day, and to verify that my practice swings were straight. Shooting some thinner for 30 minutes at a time will help immensely. I just hope I helped more this time. When you're actually ready, get ahold of one of us. I'm sure we can set down the barbie's and hot-wheels for 1/2 an hour and help you out. Give us some feedback on what's made logic and what hassn't so we can grow up! Wish we could be there to supervise.:You_Rock::You_Rock::You_Rock:
 

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Bobby78
If true, what would you run under the Lacquor...I also thought the 2K would work...
That's why said above use a high build lacquer based primer such as dupont 131s. There are other brands that are a bit cheaper in high build lacquer too. It's best not to mix different types of paint. Mixing brands in the same type isn't really a big deal. Sometimes one company's primer is easier to work with while anothers clear flows and settles better. But I would stick to lacquer all the way through or urethane all the way through. Don't mix and match.
Yeah today's lacquers aren't as bad as those years ago. All the good stuff is gone from the ingredients. Therefore they're not as durable but they are still easy to use and mistakes can be corrected in minutes where in urethane it takes hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
thanks for all the advice guys, and thanks nitro.

Right now i'm still bouncing between dupont and duplicolor. i'm already someone who sticks with the same brand of things on projects so i just have to decide which system to use.

Also i have nothing but time to prep the car as i save up to buy everything at one, supplies and paint so i'm planning the prep out. I'm going to try going the bodyshop route for the holes, trim studs, and to clean up a little bed rust. most is surface but there is the infamous stop under the rear window that should probably be cut and replaced.

The current paint is still the original black and gold, just a few deep scratches here and there so should i just rought it up and prime over it or take it down to metal and prime? There seem to be mixed opinions on that. i need to look a little more into the filling and sanding before i get started to prevent waving- hadn't really thought about that, especially with the big long panels

My end goal and vision is to paint it a darker silver metallic, then black out the trim on the bed and front end. maybe even do a smoked chrome on the wheels and bumpers. Therefore i'd have to do base color, metallic coat and clears on the body. seems lengthy, but i like the feeling of showing off my own work.

Trying to get my ducks in a row, thankfully its still 100 degrees here and i'm not motivated to paint in that just yet.
 

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There's really no need to prime properly sanded original paint. For your duplicolor system you could wet the the good areas with 400-600 grit. Just prime and block any areas that need bodywork.
If you want quick even coverage you can spray one medium wet coat of sealer over the entire car to give you a uniform base. But this would be a non-sanding sealer rather than a high-build primer that requires hours of blocking.
 

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Personally I wouldn't use lacquer. In the old days it was fine. Today there are much better, more durable, longer lasting finishes.
As far as stripping or not, a good OEM finish is a good base if properly sanded. You really don't have to remove all the old paint if it's just the original w/o any paint work. If it's been painted over then strip it.
 
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