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i gotta put my baby in storage and wonder what precautions i should take? i will only be driving it about 4 weeks out of each year and can have someone start it up every few weeks. not sure if that will be enough.
? battery out, will the seals dry up, put it up on blocks? i just dont want to cause more problems. any tips i will gladly appreciate. thanks guys :cool:
 

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aloha BRAH

:cool:
Howsit? Goin stoy Da one? I guess that you are not going to drive it at all for the rainy season? If it where mine and storing it on a long term basis,
No snow right...Start her up once in a while and I think you should be good.
If you can jack her up and let her sit off the tires as not to cause flat spots on the tires. If the storage is long term I have pulled the plugs and quenched Marvel Mystery oil or light weight into the cylinders to the top, and drained gas out of the tank to prevent turpintine like build up. When you are ready to fire up again siphen cylinder heads to remove excess oil that has not settled into the pan with a turkey baster with a narrow piece of tube, prime carb through bowl, squirt carb, cylinders with ether, vroom,
burn off oil in system and go. Doesn't hurt to check that condensation has not built up under the cap and oxidized the contacts of the cap. I probably have missed a few points but generallly hit on a few. Where in Hawaii? I used to live in the crater in Milanani (SP?) Any Help?

Old Schofield Boy
74 Elky Owner
Boy do I miss Sunset Beach
 

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One tip I use here in New England is to take some "Irish Spring" soap, and carve a few slices off of the bar. This makes it so the smell of the soap comes out. I put that in an empty coffee can, and just leave it on the floor under the glove box. Apparently, mice and other rodents don't like the smell of this soap (moth balls do the same, but getting "mothball smell" out is a pain). I also take out the rear plastic "smugglers" box and slide a small plate of the soap slices in there to. Mice really like to hide and nest in there. Also turn the sun visors down, so the little guys don't have a "shelf" to sit on and eat the headliner.

As far as putting the Elky on jack stands, I have heard many different opinions. One that makes sense to me, is if you have it on jack stands hanging down, the front suspension will get ruined as the suspension components were not designed to be "stretched" in that direction. I guess if you or someone else can start your Elky up every now and again, why not move it out of storage and back in again? Another reason I would not put it on jack stands is if there was some type of fire or other emergency, and you (or someone else) had only one opportunity to jump in and move the Elky real quick, well if its on jack stands, its not going anywhere.

Another thing I would also do, is "cap" the ends of the exhaust. Don't want any little critters in there either. Just remember to remove the "caps" before starting.

How about moisture? Is the storage a nice dry place? Do you have a cover for it? If so, get one of those "pool pillows" that people use to cover up their pools. Put that in the bed before the cover goes on. You might not need that part were you are. The last thing you want is to put a cover that doesn't breath over your Elky and trap any moisture inside. Leave the windows open, just a bit.

Clean and put a nice fresh coat of wax on it. Lube all locks.

I'm sure you'll be getting all kinds of advise here on this sight. There is a wealth of knowledge here.

Oh yea, and last thing to do before shutting the storage door, take a picture. Good luck.
 

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This was written for English cars (Morgans), so just ignore the word Morgan, or substitute El Camino and read these tips:

1. YOUR MEMORY *

Always place a list of the things you did to store the car in a very prominent place. You will need it as a check list when you "un-store" your Morgan.

2. STABILIZE THE FUEL *

There are products on the market made specially for this (Fuel Stabilizers), but you could also just add
double the amount of STP fuel treatment to the gas and run it for a few miles. This will work just as well as anything for a few months storage. Remember, if you have an EFI Morgan, you need to run it to get the mixture into the fuel injectors so they don't gum up during the storage period. The amount of petrol to put in depends on the storage space. If the space has good air circulation fill your tank to the top to prevent fuel tank condensation. If the storage space is badly ventilated, fill half the tank.

3. CHANGE THE OIL *

Change the oil and the oil filter. Old oil is contaminated with acids that result from combustion. It can eat away soft bearing surfaces if left in the engine. After changing the oil, crank the car with the ignition disconnected to allow the upper surfaces to become coated properly.

4. OILING THE CYLINDER SURFACES

This is an old racers trick. Remove the the spark plugs and put a teaspoon or two of a very light weight motor oil. PUT BACK THE SPARK PLUGS. Crank the engine with the ignition disconnected to allow the cylinder surfaces to be coated. This is better idea if you plan for a very long storage (more than 6 months) without a startup.

5. FLUSHING THE COOLANT SYSTEM

If you are amolng the more cautious, it is an idea to flush the cooling system. Or not, depending on whether you have an all-cast-iron engine or aluminum. If you've got iron, flush and replace with fresh fluid. If you are storing it for a longer period, drain the system completely including the engine block. In the case of aluminum Plus 8 engines, (and assuming you are using a coolant specially made for this motor), I would not empty the system unless you are dealing with an extremely long storage.

6. REMOVING THE RAD CAP *

Remove your radiator cap to prevent moisture buildup from being trapped in the system.

7. STARTING IT UP OR TURNING IT OVER *

Either start your car every few weeks, or turn its engine over, to avoid a set in the valve springs.

8. FLUSHING THE BRAKE FLUID

It is a good idea to flush the brake system and replace it with new fluid. You don't want old, brown, moisture laden fluid sitting around for the winter. The moisture could cause corrosion, among other things.

9. DRIVE BELTS*

Give your drive belts some relief: If possible, slightly loosen the drive and/or accessory belts to take pressure from the pulley bearings.

10. THE BATTERY *

For non-EFI and early EFI Morgans: Take your battery out and store it on a shelf, not on a concrete or dirt floor where it will slowly discharge due to moisture. A battery tender can be used to keep the battery charged.

For later EFI Morgans: The ECU in these cars has a default setting which the car will return to if the battery is disconnected. In the newer EFIs, certain elements of the programming have been altered for your Morgan and/or certain of your driving characteristics are stored in the ECU which will be lost if the battery is disconnected. It is wiser to leave the battery connected and use either a battery warmer or a trickle charger to keep it fresh and functioning. JEGS makes an excellent trickle charger...(1 amp only!).

NEVER JUMP START A EFI MORGAN WITH THE BATTERY CONNECTED.

Many jump start systems use a double charge to get you started. This can play havoc with your ignition system.

11. GREASING AND OILING*

Grease and oil all grease points, hinges, cables, etc and a touch of lubricating oil in the distributer if you have one. Change your differential oil and check and top up your transmission.

12. CLEANING, TREATING AND WAXING *

Hose out under the wheel wells to remove dirt that can hold moisture and cause rust. Wash the car and then wax it to protect the finish. Use a leather treatment (Connelly's Hide Food) on the leather and a vinyl treatment for the vinyl and plastic and a rubber oil for the rubber parts. YOUR CAR MUST BE COMPLETELY DRY BEFORE YOU COVER IT UP.

13. REMOVE YOUR TOPS *

Remove your tops and tonneau and store them in a warm dry place. They will shrink on the car and can rip at the seams.

14. THE TYRES *

You do not want your tyres to become "squared" during storage. You can just remove them. You can another 15 pounds of pressure. You can also drive them onto "car forms". However, if you are looking to relieve the pressure on the suspension and the suspension bearings the best idea is to simply jack the car and place it on 4 stands...tyres still on. This avoids the squaring problems and and takes the pressure off the suspension and shocks.

15. THE TRANSMISSION *

For non-hydraulic clutch Morgans: Put a wood 2 X 4 block between the front seat and the clutch pedal to hold the clutch disk away from the flywheel so it won't stick. (Don't do this to a car equipped with a hydraulic clutch because it will pressurize the actuating system.)

16. DESSICANTS*

A good idea would be dessicants (moisture absorber) in the passenger compartment and perhaps the engine as well. California Car Cover sells Sta-Dri pouches. Alternatively, put a couple of ceramic dishes of baking soda on the floor of your car to absorb moisture and odors.

17 A LAST FAREWELL******

Kiss the cowl just above the Morgan wings and pat the nearer wing a few times.

18. SEALING HER UP *

Put a plastic bag over the tailpipe and carb to keep the moisture, mice and rodents out. Cover the car with your choice of cover.

19 INSURANCE

Change your insurance over to fire and theft only, saving yourself some money during the storage period.

Good luck, Mizer.
 
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