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By now, I think everyone has seen a beautiful ceramic coated set of headers with that polished shine somehwere between aluminum and chrome but I am writing about a different type of ceramic coating used on engine internals and other moving components.

These "new" types of ceramic coating are used for many purposes including: i.) thermal barrier coating (prevents heat from migrating); ii.) enhanced lubrication of gears; and iii.) piston skirt lubrication. See http://www.jet-hot.com/sdfcoatings.html for brief description of these various coatings.

Q1. Does anyone have experience using such ceramic coatings on piston domes, combustion chambers, valve faces, exhaust ports as a thermal barrier. If so what brand coating was used, was the benefit sufficient to justify the cost.

Q2. Does anyone have experience using such ceramic coatings on piston skirts to decrease friction and prevent galling. If so what brand coating was used, was the benefit sufficient to justify the cost.

Q3. Does anyone have experience using a ceramic coatings (I think its called dry-film lube) on distributor gears, rear-end gears as a lubrication enhancer. If so what brand coating was used, was the benefit sufficient to justify the cost.

I am interested in such coatings for durability and also whether they increase gas mileage. If so is the gas mileage/durability increase significant enough to justify spendings hundreds of dollars on such coatings.
 

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Thats just what you need an unproven coating floating around in your combustion chamber,
 

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These coatings are certainly not unproven. Swain Tech coatings have been around for a long time.
http://www.swaintech.com/store.asp?pid=10321

I have used them before, and most certainly will be using them on the 598 big block I am currently building. You will never recoup your costs to completely coat an engine from fuel savings. These coatings are for extreme usage, where longevity is #1. As far as coating pistons is concerned, I think almost every manufacturer offers a variety of coatings depending on the intended usage of the parts. Read up on their website, and there is also a guideline price list.

I have also used Calico coatings in the past with excellent results also. You can read up on them here : http://www.calicocoatings.com/faqs/

These coatings are for real, and not unproven. Steer away from home remedy coats in a bottle. You get what you pay for. This from my experience. :secret::secret:

YOUR results may vary !!!
Regards
Brian
 

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chevy used coated pistons as well as the dodge hemi, and they all developed piston slap
 

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chevy used coated pistons as well as the dodge hemi, and they all developed piston slap
Not that it's an issue I can prove, but agree completely.

I used a set of Mahle forged blower pistons with thermal coated dish and friction coated skirts. This was going in a towing motor that had heads with a small chamber (was the best choice for the use we had). The machinist was very impressed pistons,, but within 5000 miles the thing developed a LOT of piston slap in the mornings. Not the normal forged piston making a little noise in the morning,, I'm betting the coating is striped away although I've not found any evidence in the filter or oil to date.

I had a set of custom JE pistons coated and it appears to be holding up very well.

Soooo all I'm saying is it's a GREAT idea, a great concept, and product.... but it's also just one more thing to go wrong.

Also,, no way in hell would I attempt to do a coating myself at home on internal engine parts of ANY kind. Not when the pros have issues with it releasing!!!

just my 2¢
 

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I had a Alky 526 BBC with 18 degree Big Chiefs, 14-71 blower, Buzzard Catcher, and the engine was completely coated. All of the coated componets held up extremely well. I also have a WP Chrysler executive edition 300, with a Hemi in it. It has no piston slap as of yet, but it only has 20,000 miles on it. I do not know if it has coated pistons in it. As I said before, my 598 will be competely coated.

I also said your results may vary.

It is your engine, do your home work and make the choice that works for you and your budget.

Regards Brian
 

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chevy used coated pistons as well as the dodge hemi, and they all developed piston slap
It's my understanding that GM has moved to the coated pistons on the Gen III engines to solve the piston slap problem. The Gen IIIs (and possibly Gen IV as well) use Mahle pistons. From the Mahle site:

Improved coating for less friction
The piston skirt for gasoline engines with cast or steel cylinder surfaces is usually coated with GRAFAL® at MAHLE. GRAFAL® helps to reduce friction and hence increases the scuffing resistance. A further advantage of GRAFAL®-coated pistons: They enable a closer fitting clearance which leads to significantly lower engine noise in conjunction with complex piston forms.

For the application in aluminum cylinder surfaces, MAHLE uses the iron particle reinforced synthetic resin coating FERROPRINT®. MAHLE's new FerroTec® galvanic iron layer is another ongoing development available on the market. The FerroTec® technology coats the entire skirt evenly, resulting in improved running properties. These coatings are necessary to enable the combination of aluminum pistons with pure aluminum engine blocks and hence represent an essential contribution to an overall reduction in engine weight.


Didnt know there was another denver, denver NC.
There's one in PA too.
 

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I had a thermal coating applied to the bottom of my intake manifold and piston tops. On the crank, rod bearings and piston skirts an anti friction coating was applied. The coatings were professionally done. My idea was to attempt to increase the efficiency and decrease friction in my motor. Has it helped? It is not so much that you can feel a difference, but perhaps after 200,000 miles I'll know if the coatings helped. I thought that using technology that has evolved since our rides were first built wasn't such a bad idea. I haven't had any piston slap issues or any other negatives. The bearing coatings weren't for friction reduction, but to improve lubrication efficiency. The crank and rods ride on a cushion of oil. If the oil isn't there, coatings won't help much at all. The thermal barriers probably are the most " felt" coatings. The intake charge stays a bit cooler isolated from the hot oil that normally splashes against the manifold bottom end. The coated piston tops help keep more heat in the chamber, but not so much as to increase NOX. What I decided to do was based upon my research, counsel with a respected machinist and engine builder and my ability to pay. Coatings are being used with success in aeronautical and racing applications. Maybe they are an improvement on our street run rides also, time will tell.....
 
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