El Camino Central Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

Well, the show season is over for me. No more shows locally to go to so I figured it is time to start getting the car ready for next year by starting early. One main thing that I noticed this year, since I got the car in Feb., was that everyone who knew a decent amout about chevys kept telling me that this 1970 Elky SS 396 that I have should be in a concourse judged show. Well, knowing only from what the previous owner had told me that this vehicle is all original with the exception of a repaint using the original single stage paint instead of the base/clear system, I figure I might have a good change at a concourse judged show. Granted, it has the typical factory service replacement stuff like ignition wires, cap, rotor, etc. I want to know how far I have to go to make my car into a concourse show car. The hoses (heater, radiator, and vacuum lines) are all original as the car only has 44,000 miles on it and it has never been around the clock. It even still has the date coded tower top hose clamps.I have 3 of the 4 original Goodyear Poly-glass raised white letter tires G70-14. (One peeled on me on the way home from a show in PA on I-78 ) but I figure I can get a repop from Coker. This car is very rare as I am finding out because it has power bucket seats, AM/FM/8track Stereo radio, cruise control, power windows, power locks, factory A/C, Vigilite lamp monitoring system, original T-3 headlights, low washer level alert light, and every single option pretty much known.

What my main question is : Are there specifically any judging manuals that I can get to check or make my elky into a concourse car? What do concourse judges look for? My two other cars are nice show cars but my elky from what people say is definitely a candidate for a concourse class. Any help would be extremely appreciated. This car also has a lot of its original tags in the engine compartment as well as inside the car IE- starting instructions and how to use the cruise control. Again, thank you to everyone in advance for any help they can provide me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
Wow Brian your car sounds beautiful....When you get to that level of showing a car when all is said and done a lot of it sorry to say has to do with.... politics! :evil:

I have seen so many better cars overlooked. :-( If you decided to do this remember to have fun with family and friends and enjoy all the expressions and comments from all the on lookers. :cool: Have fun and don’t let it consume all your time.

Wax on.... Wax off! :p

Dave
 

·
NECOA Founder
Joined
·
844 Posts
Brian,
Sounds like you have a special '70. Concours show judging places the emphasis on authenticity and originality.
I suggest you contact either the American Chevelle Enthusiasts Society (ACES) or Greg Martin at Gateway Chevelle Club for one of their "stock" class Chevelle/El Camino judging sheets. This will help you prepare for their level of judging. This is as close as true concours judging as I'm aware of in the Chevelle/El Camino hobby.
I know from experience that concours level judging is especially challenging in national Corvette and Shelby meets. Taking into account the original interior, exterior, tires and wheels, engine compartment and undercarriage/chassis. And, as you mentioned, all original screws, clips, brackets, clamps, etc. Those on what I consider to be the outer edge of the sport, even get into restored production line quality control marks and stamps. Personally, I find it hard to enjoy my vehicles when I have to go to that level to be competitive in an auto show. But, to each his/her own.
Greg Martin can be contacted at: [email protected]
Chuck Hanson, ACES president, can be reached from the ACES website. http://www.chevelles.com/aces/index.shtml
Whether you decide to participate in local show and shines or head for the, by-invitation-only, national concours at Pebble Beach or Amelia Island, best of luck to you in future shows.
The main thrust of our sport is to enjoy what you've got.
At ECC/NECOA we appreciate all El Camino/GMCs -- daily drivers, fully restored, basket cases or anything in-between. As some members like to say: don't crush 'em, save 'em.
Keep on cruckin'
-dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
My opinion is to have an expert actually look over the car and give his opinion on what the judges look for. Fortunatly you have a really good and well respected restoration shop in your area. Hibernia Auto Restorers is right around the corner from you. These guy do Packards,Rolls Royces,ect. Really top shelf Pebble Beach high end cars. I'd say call them up and set up an appointment for one of them to take a look at your car and give you ideas of what (if anything) to improve. However don't overlook the advise that a Chevelle/Elky expert can give you like Elky SS suggested.

My take on car shows is what 70elco said. It's all about who you know at the local level. At the national level,your competing against guys with deep pockets who have spent $100,000 on buying that COPO Camaro with 5,000 miles thats in the same "original all stock class" as you are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hi guys and thanks for everyones input on this. I know there are a few things that have been repainted from some reason the wrong color. One mainly sticks out in my mind being the hood latch mechanism. Someone painted it semi gloss black which it should originally be a gray phosphate but I believe there is a paint that is close to the original gray phosphate. One thing about our elky that we take great pride in is that by no way means is this vehicle a trailer queen. One reason we bought the car was to enjoy driving it and seeing all of the thumbs up and looks on peoples faces that we pass. Now I know some of you are probably saying "What are you thinking?!?!?" and probably have to pick your jaw up off of the floor. My father and I want to drive our car and keep it as original as off the assembly line as it came. If it gets chips, oh well, thats one of the downsides to driving it. But the fun outweighs the time involved in touching up the chips. I will be sure to check out the people mentioned especially the people local to me at Hibernia Restorations.

Thanks again for all of everyones help and one excellent site for info and friends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
I may get flamed for this one, but if you really want to have some tips on how to put it back to perfect, and find out what is not right-
Take a bunch of good high quality picturures of the car- interior, engine bay, exterior, undercarrage, etcetc and post it over on the Team Chevelle www.chevelles.com message boards... There are a bunch of guys on there that are really into the concourse level of restorations- several guys with super low mile origonal quality cars who can help "pick" yours apart and tell you what you need to do to get it right.

I'm a regular over there, and every few days, someone will post about a "rare" ebay car- and the experts will really pick it apart- and WOW they know their stuff...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
resq302

A small but possibly valuable piece of advice. Take your truck to a professional Auto Appraiser ASAP. Pay the fees and have it professionally appraised then get collectors insurance on it. This is especially important get a rider on the policy for replacement value only.

You need this as do possibly a bunch of owners of classics and Muscle car era cars and trucks. Daily driver insurances will not cover your truck if it is stolen or damaged badly. Ask your carrier if you have doubts.

Second thing is just something I've noticed. Concourse Judging will ding you a lot for wavy body panels and little spots even if they are that way from factory. So look at it really well and decide if you want to go a little bit further before entering.

From what I know, which is not a whole lot, the options with your truck make it a very uncommon commodity. I have never, until now, hear of anyone that has an Elky with all the options that were available in their model year for 72 or earlier Elkys. You've got a very nice El Camino from the sound of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Elky Pete,

All of our antiques have been appraised which is one of the first things we do when we get a new antique in our family. Our insurance company is Haggerty Collectors insurance with a zero deductible full insured value replacement. If you have your car appraised, they insure it for that much even if it is over what book value of a class one is going for. We had the elky appraised in Sept. and the appraiser was drooling over it. We were very supprised that the guy appraised it at $35,000. 8O

Anyway, the car is only driven for fun and to and from shows. The body on it is perfectly straight with no waves in it at all. There is an occasional bubble in the paint where it seems like the paint started lifting off (no rust) but that is the original paint. There is also one spot on the driverside door where there is a little bit of orange peel or fish eyes but nothing major. you really have to look at it to see it on a glare. All in all, if for some reason this elky was repainted which I doubt it was, someone must have spent millions of hours on it cause the body is PERFECTLY straight. Plus which makes it even easier to see waves and imperfections is my paint is the Tuxedo Black, black vinyl top, black interior, white SS hood stripes. As most of you may know (especially you with black cars), black paint is the most hated to keep clean and scratch free. However, when you do have a great black paint job, nothing beats it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top