El Camino Central Forum banner

Should I get rid of the 283?

  • yes, go to 327 or 396

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • no, keep 283 and play with power possibilities

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i was just wondering if there were any advantages to having a 3 speed power glide. i'm not too familiar with these trannys. also i was wondering about body part cross referencing for my 67. What parts will fit from what year, or will all second gen. parts cross over??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
67bomber said:
i was just wondering if there were any advantages to having a 3 speed power glide. i'm not too familiar with these trannys. also i was wondering about body part cross referencing for my 67. What parts will fit from what year, or will all second gen. parts cross over??
I don't recall GM manufacturing a 3-speed Power Glide, I think they were called 350 Turbo Hydro-matic by then. And either then the 400 THD or the 400 Turbo Hydromatic or Turbo Hydromatic Drive or something like that. And I'm thinking somewhere in there they tossed out a 200 series 3 speed.

Then they converted the 350 into an overdrive and called it a 700R4, I could be wrong about them using the 350 THD but I recall reading it somewhere. They took the 400 and made the 4L80e and the Turbo 200 and created the 200R4s. There was one more I think.

The 2-speed Slip & Slides (Powerglides) are great racing trannys. Its 1st then 1:1. Have to have a good engine designed around the RPM Range and shift points. A good 5.88:1 rear gear and a nice Big Block and man you own it! :D Problem would be street driving with that combo. Have to have something like a 3500 to 4500 Stall converter, the way I see it, so taking off at lights would be a real loosing deal with cops anywhere close.

I think a good set of 3.73 or even up to 4.10:1 rear gears and a 700R4 or 200R4, power built something with redone pumps and clutches, is the best overall satisfier. That is my opinion.

My logic is that you have a good steep take off for quick starts, and up to 3 it is pretty much the same as the 350 THD transmission. 4th kicks in and it drops the ratio down to a .70 (700R4) or .63 (200R4). So now for a .70 (700R4) and a 4.10:1 Gearset it would be equal to driving a 350 with a 2.87:1. So you'd be turning roughly 2100 to 2300 RPM at 60 Mph. That equals gas mileage. So you get to have a lot of fun from a dead stop and still get moderate gas mileage. For a 200R4 it would be 2.58:1 for a final drive with the same set up of gears. So your RPM is even lower at 60 Mph.

I have, in my 76 Elky, 2.73:1 Gears and a 350 THD. @60 it is turning a nice slow 2100 RPM. Good economy! Poor starts, I loose all the rpm when it shifts into second. The 350 has a steep 1st and a wide gap to second. It goes from 3.xx to 1.xx from 1st to 2nd and it is more than half the difference. The 200R4s are better in that they still do about the same split only it is slightly smaller gap being just under half of 1st' value.

That is my interpretation of the information I have read regarding the type of transmissions we have to choose from. I am no means a Certified Mechanic and I don't specialize in transmissions. :D I am just a hot rod junky that try's to see how I can have my cake and eat it too.

350, 700R4 & the 200/200R4 all are designed to handle up to 350 Lb/ft. of torque from what I have read. I might be a little off on the 200 series, it could only be 300 for that one. The 400 & 4L80 the spec jumps to 450 Lb./ft. of torque. This is all stock ratings the way I understand them. The 4L80 is Computer controlled 100% so figure in about another 2K for the computer. The 700R4 can be manually operated for engaging the torque converter lock. And I have one (700R4) that doesn't use "Non-Lockup" type converters. So extra costs are associated in the upfront cost of any overdrive. Generally a new drive shaft and possibly relocating the crossmember.

There are lots of sources for this information on the net;


http://superchevy-web.com/tech/0305sc_chevelltech/

http://superchevy-web.com/tech/0301SC_USGEAR/

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/84121/


http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/55938/

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/52018/

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/41798/

Like I said this is my $0.02 worth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
been too long

sorry it took so long to answer back just wanted to say thanx for the info it helped out a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
yes or no 283

yeah if you still want a v6 go with a 231 buick u r able to put turbo (grand national) thats if you u want to stick with a 6.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,048 Posts
Your pretty much correct Ernie ceptin that we all use to coll the Powerglide the Powerslide not a slip and slide...a slipin slide is somethin us po folk have in our yard who can't afford a swimmin pool. They did make great racing trannys tho...the Powerslide that is not the slippin slide. They were at one time the trannys used in A/A Fuel Dragsters when boys like that Don Garlits fella were just punk kids. :lol:

__________________
Best Car Insurance | Auto Protection Today | FREE Trade-In Quote
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
oh yes. sliding.

and im assumin that they called it Powerslide because in mine, i can get the car sideways on command. (its great fun). and yes the 2 speed is not good off the line with cops around. especially with the open differential. (i need to get that fixed yes?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
ElkyPete said:
The 350 has a steep 1st and a wide gap to second. It goes from 3.xx to 1.xx from 1st to 2nd and it is more than half the difference.
I think you meant the 700r4 has the steep first and large gap to second. A TH350 has 2.52:1 first, 1.52:1 second, and 1:1 third.

A TH400 has 2.48:1 first, 1.48:1 second, and 1:1 third.

My '76 sprint with Th400 and 215/75/15 rear tires and 2.56 gears pulls 60mph at approx 1800rpm's. I average 10-13mpg cruising 70-80mph.

Charles
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top