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How can I detail a tuxedo black car with really thin paint that has some lacquer check in some places because I tried quick detainer because I don’t want to mess up the paint but I was wondering is there another way I can detail it without messing up the paint
 

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Here is a link to one of Mike Phillips' articles on restoring a classic's original lacquer.


Member @BillyJack uses this method on his beautiful original paint 1987 El Camino.
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Can you clarify for us if you used the word "Detailing" to mean "Polishing" or "Regular Maintenance"?

The info I put in link above is for "Polishing" or what we would call paint correction.

For regular cleaning of a car with minimal dust, the goal is to not add anymore scratches.
I don't use water to wash the El Camino.
Instead I use a waterless wash product like these two along with many clean quality microfiber towels.
I fold the towel twice, making 8 sections.
Then as I wipe off the sprayed on solution, I rotate my hand and towel to have the towel move to clean portions of the towel.
Try to not allow the dirt/dust to be pushed into the paint by using your fingers to roll as you go.
Rather than a sharp dark line of dust collected on the towel, you want to see it spread over about 1 to 2 inches.
Then move to a clean part of towel for the next wipe.
Since you will wash your microfiber towels, it should not be a concern about how many you get dirty.

Both products have a higher lubricity than a regular detailing solution.


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Here is my El Camino (two stage base coat plus clear) with Meguiar's Ultimate Waterless Wash And Wax Anywhere used to clean it and add a little protection..
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This image shows a towel used for one panel when the truck was rather dirt from California wild fires dust collection.

Instead of thin dust lines, you see line about 1 inch.
I slowly roll the towel as I wipe, to have the dust go into the microfiber and try to present new clean fibers.
Then roll the towel forward a little in my hand before repeating for the next swipe.
The image shows 1 panel of 8 for a towel, with 4 swipes that might have been used for the top half of the drivers door.
Using 8 towels, with 8 folded sections each and a few swipes per section is normal for me.
The towels get washed in warm water and Tide without fabric softener in a cold water rinse.
They then get fluff dried on either lowest or no heat, so as not to melt the fibers which can causes paint scratching.
Next they are inspected and sorted by "grade" before reuse.

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I would recommend avoiding use of a power rotary polisher on thin paint. It is easy to burn through.

There is an alternative called dual action polisher that oscillates and slowly rotates.
However care needs to be used on thin paint and the pads need to be kept clean to keep from having dirt caught which will add scratches.
 

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I mean polishing
Polishing will remove paint. They will call it "paint correction" or whatever the term of the day is. There is only so much you can do. Every time you polish or buff a car there is a minute amount of paint removed, sorry, just a fact of paint life. I've polished the original paint on my car to the point that the factory primer is showing through in many areas and it still dulls back in a few weeks. You described lacquer check in your original post. The cracks will go down into the primers. Dust, dissolved solids and such will get to the base and you can strip the paint and the pattern will still be there in sub layers. There really is nothing left but keeping the best shine possible. Buff it to a good shine and wax it often. The next step is stripping to the metal because the primers will have absorbed the wax and everything else and will cause problems for the next paint job. If someone has a miracle cure to change my 39 years of experience as a body and paint tech I'm all ears.

Old Bear has some good points. Great care is necessary, but gotta say doesn't matter what method you use. Polishing involves removing paint to get to the shiny part. One more time, lacquer checking means that the elements will be in the sub coats/primers. Do your best to keep it shining, best of luck.

Joe
 

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I'm a strong believer in using Meguiars M07 Show Car glaze on old school lacquer paint. Mike Phillip's method of allowing an overnight soak before removing was a true game changer on my Camino's aged, oxidized paint.
I first tried it ten years ago before a local judged All-Chevy show, earning a 1st place, plus 6 or 7 more trophies at the same annual show in subsequent years. Another product I use on dark colored cars before the final wax is Poorboy's World "Black Hole' glaze. It's a very mild cleaner that both adds gloss and hides some minor defects.
Depending on my perceived estimation of paint film thickness, my yearly restoration steps include: M07 soak, machine polish (on areas with enough paint), Black Hole, then a non-cleaning finishing wax.

Bill
 
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