El Camino Central Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I parked my car only to come out the next morning to find it smelled like gas I crawled underneath and sure enough the line has a hole in it along the frame rail. My question is can I get a section of fuel injection rubber hose and it that in instead of the hard steel line? The section along the frame rail (from the from of the door to the rear tire) seems to be the only corroded part.
 

·
Deputy Director Region 6
Joined
·
8,714 Posts
I would replace the whole line ! I got a new line for mine from inlinetube.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
I parked my car only to come out the next morning to find it smelled like gas I crawled underneath and sure enough the line has a hole in it along the frame rail. My question is can I get a section of fuel injection rubber hose and it that in instead of the hard steel line? The section along the frame rail (from the from of the door to the rear tire) seems to be the only corroded part.

Seems hard to believe that there was only one corroded section of fuel line. Up north here, salt gets sprayed on the fuel lines during winter months when driving in salted snow (and water). Obviously this causes the fuel lines to rust faster. My experience is the opposite of your conclusion that only one section is corroded (like an exhaust pipe one section will fail first but by that point the rest of the system is usually also paper thin).

I would order the new lines from inlinetube and be safe while getting this project over with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Seems hard to believe that there was only one corroded section of fuel line. Up north here, salt gets sprayed on the fuel lines during winter months when driving in salted snow (and water). Obviously this causes the fuel lines to rust faster. My experience is the opposite of your conclusion that only one section is corroded (like an exhaust pipe one section will fail first but by that point the rest of the system is usually also paper thin).

I would order the new lines from inlinetube and be safe while getting this project over with.
The car has never been driven in winter so there's very little corrosion on the car. I've looked over all the lines and the lines in that section are the only ones with corrosion. My question is can I use rubber fuel injection hose to replace that peice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,818 Posts
I agree the the entire line should be replaced. However, cutting the section out and using some rubber hose as a temporary repair is fine. You won't even need "FI" hose unless your fuel supply is under high pressure. Conventional fuel line will be just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I agree the the entire line should be replaced. However, cutting the section out and using some rubber hose as a temporary repair is fine. You won't even need "FI" hose unless your fuel supply is under high pressure. Conventional fuel line will be just fine.
Thank you. I probably should have said it was just temporary il be replacing all the plumbing in the car at some point just don't have the money right now
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
604 Posts
Bailey, I've said it here many times; I run a braided AN-6 fuel line , tank to carb, w/an- fittings. Total cost with the fittings and 20 ft line is ~$150 but works great . Look at the kits from SUMMIT, JEGS etc. Dale
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Another thought might be a piece of hard line and a couple of compression couplings.
Ang.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Sorry for the second post but a good way to protect the fuel line if you use the rubber line is to go to an electrical supply house and get some 3/4" aluminum flex conduit slide it on the hard line before you make your connection then slide it over the rubber line to protect it from road debris while you drive. I did this on the lines I ran for my trany cooler and also on some fuel line running to and from my fuel pump and filter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,123 Posts
I use a LOT of AN braided fuel hose on airplanes.
There are different types of line that are braided on the outer side, low, medium, and high pressure types.
The high pressure type, 3000 PSI on smaller diameters,like Aeroquip 303 is really tough, and good for 12-15 years. The medium pressure type, like 600 or 700 series, isn't quite a strong physically, but is around 1000 PSI hose. Had some of that type develop leaks on one of my Elcos

The tough stuff, the 303 hose, has a black covering over the braid.

Buying the good stuff, like the 303-6 hose, would cost more that a new line from inlinetube.com. ( Currently $7.63 a foot !)
And you don't need stainless line for a summer car, but painting the standard steel line will give it more longevity..
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
303 line would be SOOO over kill, not to mention the cost of the AN fittings and the mandrel to assemble the hose, last time I looked it was $45 for the mandrel from ATS tool.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top