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Hello to all. Being new to El Camino Central, and El Caminos in general. I have a silly question. I have always liked El Caminos but never owned one. Now I am the owner of a very nice 1974 El Camino Classic. My quesiton is...Why is it so hard to find anything for the 1974? Everything I see is from '66-'72 and then '78- Why is the '73-'77 missing in all these? Have I lucked into a hard to find rolling piece of art? Or is it that they are just soooo common that nobody worries about listing them? Well, That's my question. Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.
 

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It's a hard to find rolling piece of art. I think the reason is if you look at GM's production figures for the El Camino during the years 73-77 you may find their sales down. I'm kinda an old guy and I can remember when GM changed the body style from the Gen III to the Gen IV, it didn't go over to well. It wasn't just the body style but also the fact that people also got nailed by their insurance companies for having cars that had emblems like SS on them and engine options like 454, and the EPA was after the manufactures for producing big cubic inch engines, so they made low performance smog engines. To us it was the true end of the Muscle Car Era. There was kinda hope for us we thought in the 71-72 cars, they at least resembled the 1970 El Caminos' and Chevelles, the factory Hot Rods. We also got new names crammed down our throats like Laguna (I remember making a comment that it looked like a Creature from the Black Lagoona) and S-3 that didn't go over to well. Yeah there were still SS 454 models but they were just shadows of their predecesors. Even the Camaros and Novas went sour. It was a period of tears and a time of adjustment. The Gen V was helped by the fact that it had a longer production run (78-87) which saved GM money by not having to retool their factories as often and that it kinda resembled the older models, and of course the longer it ran, the more the sales, and the more in sales ment the higher need for replacement parts. Do I like the style of the 73-77, not particularly, does that matter?, no!, what does matter is that you like the 73-77 Elky...yours! And now you have a place (El Camino Central) where you can enjoy your Elky with others no matter what Generation. Where maybe if there are enough of us we can be heard by the parts reproduction manufacturers, and get them to start making the parts we're all looking for, thats why it's important for all members to get involved, or maybe one day I might be picking parts off an Elky in a boneyard... YOUR ELKY!!! It's so nice to live in El camino heaven. Mike

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Like Mike said, the fourth generation El Caminos are the most overlooked and hardest to find parts for. They, generally, are the hardest to resale. That being the case, they are also, usually the best bargins if you are looking for a driver. I'm sorry to say that, collector wise, this generation will continue to be the least collectible. For most of the reasons Mike described above. This was the period of the Arab Oil Imbargo and an especially anti-horsepower period in automotive history.
Last note, owning an automobile is a personal taste experience. If a 73-77 Elky rings your bell... by golly, go get one and enjoy the he** out of it.
 
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