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Discussion Starter #1
Everytime I get out of my 79' Elky and put my feet on the ground, I get shocked when I go to close the door (or touch the car agian for any purpose). After I touch it once, I don't get shocked again. I have no idea why this would happen, and really didn't notice it until I had to get rid of the corolla and start using the elky as my daily driver.

BTW, I have a new alternator and everything else seems fine with regards to the electrical system.

Could she be carrying a charge at all times? Any suggestions will help.

Thanks, Ethan
 

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I'll bet you have a vinyl seat.

During the Winter months the cold, dry air is an ideal climatic condition to create static electricity. A static charge is created when you slide off the seat. You've now become a human capacitor. You then discharge the static electricity when you touch the metal of your El Camino.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yup- Vinyl with some Chevorlet seat covers. Shouldn't slept thru my science class.
Looking to change seats out before summer. Gotta find some good ones from the Junkyard first. How easy is it to remove the stock ones? Any special tooling required?
 

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Very easy change...especially if it is a bench seat. Only caution is that sometimes the bolts have been buggered up by a previous owner. Usually only two bolts on each rear mount and one or two on each front mount. You should clean the tops off first with a small wire brush to clean the tops of the threads, and perhaps spray a little liquid wrench (or similar) to free things up. Be careful not to overspray and stain your carpet.

Try to use a short socket with an offset rachet wrench so you can get at the bolt properly. Or use a small box wrench. These are easy to strip so do not use too large a tool or an open-ended adjustable wrench which might turn and strip the bolt. Have fun.
 

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Elky E said:
How easy is it to remove the stock ones? Any special tooling required?
Assuming it's a bench seat, it's is attached to the floor pan studs by a half dozen or so nuts. Some may be hidden by some black plastic trim pieces. You'll need a phillips screwdriver to remove the plastic trim and a deep socket (1/2" or 9/16"?) to get the nuts off. Then the seat and seat rails just lift out.

How did you pass science without knowing about static electricity?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's not a bench. There are two bucket type vinyl seats separated by the wood paneled center console and arm rest. Would it be cheaper to get the current seats re-finished or get some Junkers?

I have seen the plastic trim, so I think I know what I'm dealing with now.


BTW, who said anything about passing science class???
 

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Elky E said:
Would it be cheaper to get the current seats re-finished or get some Junkers?
Third gen Camaro or Fireturd buckets will fit nicely if you use your original seat rails. There are probably others too. Use the search engine here. This has been discussed before.
 

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I have the same problem with my 98 Lumina & the 93 Pickup. Its static electricity. You can help by using some fabric softener in your wash for your cloths. You can also use fabric softener on the carpet to help with that. Nothing will completely remove it. Dry cold air or very dry air of most any type but usually in cold weather.

It has to do with the different materials called insulators. Its the same effect as rubbing a balloon on some wool or your hair. It becomes charged with electrons waiting for a place to discharge. In your body's case it finds ground through the metal piece of your car or a door knob at your home, someone's ear :D.

My Lumina has cloth and so does my truck. I go rid of most of it by using a fabric softener in the steam cleaner after the carpet and seats were cleaned and I make sure my wife uses it in with my jeans and other cloths. A dryer sheet rubbed on the carpet and seats will also do the trick but you will have to use a lot of them I would guess.

That is the #1 killer of electronics. If you can feel it then its several thousand volts. It takes less than you can feel to destroy an electronic circuit.
 

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Static electricity

Static electricity is usually encountred for a couple of days after a severe cold front has passed through the area (drier and colder air than normal). It is not likely you will ever eliminate static, but you can avoid those nasty, uncomfortable electric jolts by firmly grasping and holding a metal part of the car before sliding on the seat to exit the vehicle. Any metal part that is grounded to the frame will work fine.
 
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static

I have had trouble with this also. The jolt you feel is the difference of electrical charges. Try and remeber to grab on to a good ground before sliding acrossed the seat, this is easier on older cars, nearly impossible on newer plastic cars. Cheap fix.
 

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I may be dating myself, but years ago I remember seeing some vehicles with thin metal strips dragging the ground. I think they were attached to the frame & had a lightning bolt logo on them. I assumed that they were a ground source to attempt to eliminate the static electricity build up. I have no idea whether they worked or not. It may be something to look into though. Jon
 

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i was just going to say that. my friends' parents had them on a van and they had a lightning bolt sticker on 'em.
not sure what they are called though :oops:
 
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I am not sure if those straps work, makes sense as far as attaching a strap the frame, but just dragging it over pavement???? Judging that I no longer see them, it doesnt appear they worked. I have heard a moving car can build a static charge with the flexing of the belted tires as they roll, this is why toll booths have you throw the money in a basket, instead of attendants taking change directly from you. I dont know any attendants personally, but it makes sense.
 

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They were called "Static Straps", they were around in the 60s, I don't know how they worked or even if they did. It was kind of an ethnic accessory, kind of like curb feelers. I don't want to be politically incorrect here. I think it was just something for the parts stores to sell to make money because after a while they would wear and not touch they ground anyway. Kind of like the blue lighted windshield washer sprays that are out there now.
 
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