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ZERO MPG
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What carb base gasket did you use on your new intake manifold? The 1/4 inch thick one?
Here's the one I used I'm not sure how thick but a 1/4 inch sounds correct? I'm still learning about quality the hard way so ask a little more but it's working fine now and I checked it for leaks with a propane torch and it's not leaking yet.:beer:

I think I have an extra new one need it? I can send it no charge if I have it.





Duralast By Felpro/Carburetor Mounting Base Gasket

For your 1987 Chevrolet Truck El Camino 5.0L 4BL OHV 8cyl

Price: $7.99
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Part Number: 60482
Alternate Part Number: 66-0248
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Each gasket, set or seal is built to meet or exceed all OE specifications and is validated for fit, form and function. Application specific design to ensure a perfect fit and correct operation for unsurpassed quality that you can trust.
 

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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #6
I lost most of my faith in the mass-market auto parts stores when I took a u-joint into our local O'Reilly's. They usually do better than most, but when I laid that on the counter and said I needed a replacement, the kid behind the counter said, "What is that thing?"

Obviously a front-drive, fart-can Honda driver!
 

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ZERO MPG
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I don't leave home without the part number I looked up first. It took awhile wondering how I picked out the wrong number it always said a perfect fit. NO the last year El Camino got all the left over parts and bolts. I have ASE and metric all over my truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On that metric/non-metric bolt thing...

Here's the deal. GM started a major overhaul of their designs in 1976, inspired by the oil embargo in 1973/74. They announced that they were going over to metric fasteners, but only on newly redesigned parts. So, if you had a part that was the same as previous years, it had ASE bolts. If it was a new part, it had metric bolts. This made it necessary to keep two whole sets of tools so that you could work on your car.

I had a 1982 Pontiac Phoenix. ALL the parts on it were metric, except the engine parts, since it had the old Iron Duke engine.
 

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ZERO MPG
Joined
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15,367 Posts
On that metric/non-metric bolt thing...

Here's the deal. GM started a major overhaul of their designs in 1976, inspired by the oil embargo in 1973/74. They announced that they were going over to metric fasteners, but only on newly redesigned parts. So, if you had a part that was the same as previous years, it had ASE bolts. If it was a new part, it had metric bolts. This made it necessary to keep two whole sets of tools so that you could work on your car.

I had a 1982 Pontiac Phoenix. ALL the parts on it were metric, except the engine parts, since it had the old Iron Duke engine.
How well I know ,
 

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Deputy Director, Region 1
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And some bolts have metric heads and SAE threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, you can work on your car with metric sockets, even if it has SAE bolts. Almost all of them are compatible with a metric size. In fact, that's what I've been doing the last 3 weeks on my El Camino.
 
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