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I have a couple small (1/8" to 1/2") holes in my fenders. I have a MIG welder and I'm wondering if holes can be filled with a MIG. If so, what process/procedure? If not, what can I do?

Jack
 

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get some copper 1/4 thick hold inside of the spot to be repaired low heat but keep little welds heat warps metal in car bodys
 

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We're all kind of amateur body men if we haven't done it for a living. What I would do, if I had a welder, is tack some sheet metal behind the panel at the damaged location, even if through the small holes on the front side, and then body filler. I wouldn't attempt to fill the holes with weld.
 

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The most common help tool is clamping a scrap of copper to the backside of area, weld won,t stick to it. Do small bursts at a time, possibly jumping from one to another patch area , this will minimize warping. Also be slow & patient on your grinding to avoid warp. On 1/2" hole , you may want to tightly fit plug from scrap metal, tight fit helps on warpage.
Here,s a thread on larger patches you or someone may find interesting.
http://www.pro-touring.com/showthread.php?56688-Tip-for-making-small-panel-patches
 

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First grind or DA with say 40 grit to get the paint off and see how big those holes really are. What you'll most likely find is that even though the holes on the outside aren't that big that you have a larger area of rust behind it on the inside. Trying to weld rusty metal is a bit tough and a waste of time and material. It'll pop like crazy. Best thing is to cut out the entire area and either buy or make a patch panel. Use weld thru primer on the edges before welding. You can get that primer in spray cans.
 

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Easy fix ,use a pop rivet that don't rust . grind it down a little fill over it !!! There you go .:beer:
That'll come back up in no time. First you'll see the rivets then the edges of the patch. You could use the adhesive for patching. It'll work too and it's waterproof. Check eastwood they have kits.
But then you did say you have a MIG so either way. Personnally I'd cut any rusted areas away and start fresh.
 

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I just removed all the trim down the side of my 77 classic, then mig welded the holes, talk about time consuming,(a little anti heat putty will help stop warpage) take your time,work one side of the hole, then the other(don't get the sheetmetal too hot. weld on the lowest heat possible, you wouldn't believe how many times i blew the hole bigger then had to chase around to fix it.if the holes are dime size or bigger maybe spot a peice to the backside then fill in the hole, (i like the copper idea, never thought of such)take it slow, grind down/finish the weld,(you should never be able to see where the hole was)you will end up with a good looking permanent patch. GL
 

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Discussion Starter #10
if the holes are dime size or bigger maybe spot a peice to the backside then fill in the hole take it slow, grind down/finish the weld,(you should never be able to see where the hole was)you will end up with a good looking permanent patch. GL
Do you mean to fill in with body putty or weld?
 

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Didn,t realize you were talking about rust holes. Welding a patch to the backside is the same as doing a lap joint, Which creates the potential to hold moisture--- which causes more rust. For rust , cutting out the area to rust free material, whether drilling a hole with a stepbit, holesaw, jigsaw or whatever & cutting a tightpatch to spot weld in is the preferred method for rust & to make the final of the repair disappear.
The new structual adhesives Bobby spoke of will hold a lap joint just fine if you prefer not to weld. you could see a shadow of the repair later with a lap joint & adhesive though. It's not product failure, rather a difference in material thickness & type(the adhesive). For a non show car paintjob , you may never know.
Sorry but modern pennys are not solid copper, they would be too expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They aren't rust holes. They're holes from things, like trim etc., that were mounted and removed.
 

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Do you mean to fill in with body putty or weld?

never ever fill in a hole with body putty, (unless you want the hole back soon)spotting a peice to the backside and welding would be my solution, then the peice on the backside can be ground off/removed(if you can get to it to spot it in place you can get to it to remove it). i like the idea of clamping a peice of copper in place, i didn't know a mig wouldn't stick to it(gonna try that this weekend),
 

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Best trick for small holes is to get various nails. Drill the hole so one of the heads JUST fits into the hole. You can then clamp the welders ground clamp to the nail, then use this to hold it into the hole and hit it with the mig. After set, grind off the nail. Works reakky well for small trim holes.

I have also welded a nail into a washer then this assembly into a larger hole.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Best trick for small holes is to get various nails. Drill the hole so one of the heads JUST fits into the hole. You can then clamp the welders ground clamp to the nail, then use this to hold it into the hole and hit it with the mig. After set, grind off the nail. Works reakky well for small trim holes.

I have also welded a nail into a washer then this assembly into a larger hole.

Good luck
Great idea!
 
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