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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, this is not my first restoration, but it is my first Chevy. I have minor rot that needs to be repaired, so I'm going to R&R my lower windshield repair panel.

Usually, you see dimples for spot welds. Does the factory lower windshield panel have spot welds? Just a quick glance and it looks completely smooth. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

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Be careful repairing the windshield channel! It has to be correctly aligned to support and seal the windshield.

Questions: How are you going to make the channel repairs and, more importantly, what are you going to use? How bad is the rust and where? How many places look like the one spot visible in your photo? Are you going to fabricate your own patch panels or is your plan to replace the whole lower channel in one piece?

Spot welds are sometimes hard to see/feel. I suggest using a wire wheel and removing all of the windshield sealer, paint, etc. down to the metal itself. Do not use a grinder! Very likely the windshield channel is stamped steel with support structures that are then spot welded very likely at the ends and along the outermost front edge. Before you cut out any rust, be sure to have the replacement panel to plan how to do the welding. Again, be careful to not warp or misalign the channel when welding!

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thank you @57 Handyman. Please guys, know that this isn’t my first restoration. I’m also wrapping up a “cheap” $70k 1967 Mustang at the moment.

I perform all my own metal work. I appreciate your words of caution. But I am simply asking about spot welds. This being my first full restoration of a classic Chevy, I’m learning the engineering as I go. The lower windshield panel is so smooth, I would almost think they used panel bonding methods.

And as I mentioned, at a quick glance- in other words, a couple minutes before sundown after pulling the windshield, I did not immediately see any spot weld dimples. I suppose I should’ve looked closer before posting.

I have a GM restoration lower panel from AMD. And as I’ve done on all my restorations, I start by cutting out only what’s necessary.

Thanks for your responses gentlemen. I appreciate your desire to help.
 

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My apologies for assuming your comment about first time only applied to GM and not classic restoration projects. As for your question about GM and panel bonding, although this was quite early in these technology/assembly methods, I did find the use of bonding and sealant materials in between multi-layered panels on my 87 El Camino. As a result, separating panels becomes a pain since the panels do no release when spot welds are drilled. In order to separate panels on cowl and windshield ends where I found as much as 4-5 sandwiched panels. I also found this method of bonded multiple panels along lower edge of body and main pinch welds.

Once spot welds were drilled, I applied heat from heat gun before attempting to separate individual layers with sheet metal chisels and a lot of hammering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As for your question about GM and panel bonding, although this was quite early in these technology/assembly methods, I did find the use of bonding and sealant materials in between multi-layered panels on my 87 El Camino.
No worries at all! I’m new to the forum, so makes sense.

And regarding panel bonding, I agree. I definitely hadn’t seen the use of it with something so old, but at first glance that panel looks perfectly smooth.

One feather posted some great pics for reference for all who undertake this future project!
 
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