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Does any fellow members here in California, have their El Camino's registered as historical, antique or classic?
I see a plate every now and then.

Gary... 1985 El Camino Conquista 305.
 

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Reg 18 California Historic Vehicle Plates
 

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While I am not in California, I do have a '79 El Camino with Washington collector plates. Washington charges a one time registration fee good for the rest of the car's life. The only problems are, the State only allows up to 10% of my annual mileage to be driven (but how will they ever know unless a police officer sees me on a very regular basis), and that as a truck, I am not allowed to use the bed to haul ANYTHING, with the exception of car show peraphernalia and accessories. I have heard that people have received a ticket for putting their groceries in the bed (that's some petty bologna if you ask me, because somebody can re-store and register an old woody wagon for instance and throw a surfboard in the back for a day at the beach and that's OK because "it's not a truck"). In my case, I have no intention of using my '79 as a hauler, it is a 40,000 mile original. I have a 200,000+ mile '78 Caballero for any hauling I need.
BTW: before collector plates $92/yr.
A one time fee of $144.
after collector plates $never again.
 

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Cali sure has some Draconian laws. My 82 has an “antique plate”. The real only advantage is that its about $20/year compared to around $50 if I were to use a regular plate. Plus it’s a cool blue color.

My 65 FJ40 Landcruiser has a “Year of Manufacture Tag”. Those are really cool.

As for not being allowed to use the bed....thats insane.
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"As for not being allowed to use the bed....thats insane. ".

I believe this came law in multiple states when the trucking industry/unions wanted to have anyone who might compete with them to have a commercial license on their "beds".

This is one reason that shells were popular on Rancheros, El Caminos and pickups. That let them be licensed as house-cars.
 
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