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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #1
I know this really isn't the correct way to mount the motor to the stand bracket but if I want to get it off my truck tonight this is the only way but I don't want to if this is a bad idea. I need it this low to do it without the fork lift.




 

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Nothing wrong with that - you got four bolts cinched up tight, big washers, I say hang it, you're good. I like to have the pivot more centered on the motor, the four bolts on the center piece could be loosened and the pivot placed more over the back cam knockout. Then re-tightened of course

But thats just preference, it makes the motor easier to rotate, but what you have will work.
 

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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #3
Nothing wrong with that - you got four bolts cinched up tight, big washers, I say hang it, you're good.
Cool I wasn't sure about the stress on the bolts that way.
Thanks:beer:
 

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Cool I wasn't sure about the stress on the bolts that way.
Thanks:beer:
That motor only weighs 600 pounds or so, divided by 4 bolts and assuming you arent using bolts made of lead or something, the stress is mostly irrelevanti suppose the cheapest bolts in the world might be a problem but not any bolts that came with the stand. I find it more convenient to center the pivot more on the motor, makes it easier when flipping the motor over.

Doesnt change the stress on the bolts much though. If you have to have the pivot that low to get it off the truck do it. -
 

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Not sure what you are doing there.

Are you trying to install the motor into the cruck right from the engine stand, without an engine hoist?

Where is the tranny in all this? Usually you install the torque converter, then the tranny, then the set together into the vehicle. (make SURE you do not attach the torque converter to the tranny until AFTER the tranny is fully attached to the engine (Do you know about the 2 "steps" in the TC shaft?))

Phil

ps: While the connection you are showing I agree is fine, when it is mounted, only the top 1 or 2 bolts are carrying the full weight. Make sure you have enough threads capturing the engine block. It is NOT the engine weight divided by 4.
 

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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #6
No I needed to get the motor out of the bed of my truck and I was off a little to connect the stand to the motor so I wanted to make sure the four bars were ok in the picture.

Now it's ready to get a por-15 paint job.



 
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So where's the engine hoist in all this? Do you have the plate to attach the hoist the intake or are you gonna be using the block itself to attach to the hoist?
 

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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #8
So where's the engine hoist in all this? Do you have the plate to attach the hoist the intake or are you gonna be using the block itself to attach to the hoist?
Got it all covered it's time to start.:beer: Dude this is East L.A. Every home has a hoist.
 

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I would adjust the top 2 supports and move them down one spot,spread out the holding power of the stand head.
When you rotate a heavy engine,you'll be glad you did.
 

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Got it all covered it's time to start.:beer: Dude this is East L.A. Every home has a hoist.

And this is Polk county where every "home" has 4 cement blocks with an old 4x4 sitting on them in the yard.

Like the others have said, my preference would be to center the engine more, but the way you have it looks good.:beer:

Just stay away from them lead bolts.
 

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Where is the tranny in all this? Usually you install the torque converter, then the tranny, then the set together into the vehicle. (make SURE you do not attach the torque converter to the tranny until AFTER the tranny is fully attached to the engine (Do you know about the 2 "steps" in the TC shaft?))
I dont think I quite follow this advice. The torque convertor doesnt ever "attach" to the transmission, it just slides onto the transmission input shaft. It should be slid onto that shaft before the new engine is anywhere near to the transmission. its AFTER the engine and transmission are attached that the convertor is slid forward a fraction of an inch and then bolted (attached) to the engine.

In this instance (swap of engine) the convertor need never even be removed from the tranny, simply unbolt it from below before disconnecting the original engine, slide the convertor back a bit to give some clearance from the flex plate, then pull the original engine. This avoids the mess of removing the old convertor.

As for the difference between 2 or 4 bolts, it still shouldnt matter, even a grade 1 A36 bolt has a yield strength of 36,000 psi and a max tensile strength of 60,000 psi, shear values arent published but are something like 50% to 60% of yield values, more than enough to hold up a 600# motor. So long as no bending forces are imposed the bolts are fine, and since they are cinched up tight there will be no bending forces.
 

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ZERO MPG
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the input and I need a lot more but so we don't get confused I have moved all my questions to restorations for my engine build. I can use all the help I can get so lets consider this thread closed and moved .
Thanks again.:You_Rock:
Robert
 
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