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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a couple of pics of my small block i just dropped in this weekend. Motor was rebuilt right before i bought the car so i just pulled it, cleaned it up, put on some shiny stuff, new intake (i powder coated it), crane cam and lifters, and a 650 demon carb. Can't believe the headers fit, they're my dads old ones from his 69 Nova which fit really good with just a little tweaking.



 

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Discussion Starter #3
yeah its the same one from eastwood, not the professional setup but the lower priced one. Its pretty good i really like it, had for about 3 years now and still works great. The one thing that you will need if you get it is an electric oven or the heat lamp eastwood sells. I got an old eletric oven from a repairman friend, put some casters on it an stuck in the garage which works out pretty good, but a little limited on space the biggest thing i can do is a 15x10 rim. its still better than paint and holds up pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
oh yeah its great to do aluminum intakes with, since over time the aluminum will soak up whatever gets on it and looks like crap, when power coated whatever you get on it just wipes right off
 

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I know the wife would not appreciate me baking engine parts in the kitchen stove. I once cleaned an intake in the dishwasher, cleaned up very well but it took a few washes to get the oil residue out of the dishwasher :oops:
As with any finishing procedure, cleanliness is a must. How clean must parts be for powdercoating? Of course no oil, grease, or dirt. But, for example, a rusty part that was wirewheeled and not sandblasted. How would that turn out?
How much "overspray" is there and how hard is it to clean up?
Is the powder UV stable?
Abrasion and chemical resistance?
I do not mean to hijack your post. I appreciate any answers anyone can provide.
BTW- engine bay looks real nice!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The best way to prep the parts is of course to sand blast the, but i wire wheeled my rear control arms before i coated them and the came out pretty good, the only difference i've notices that that the wire wheeled parts are not quites as smooth when they are finished but still turn out alright as long as you wire wheel them real good. Before you coat them you bake your part for 20 minutes to release any trapped dirt in the metal let cool them coat and bake. Overspay, well there isn't really overspray but there is powder all over the floor when you are done, to clean it up just sweep thats it, the gun cleans up easy with air to blow the powder out. Just make sure it well ventilated where ever you do it. Not too sure about the UV stability all the parts i have done are underhood and suspension parts. As far as the chemical resistance i know that it holds up under gas that why i did the manifold so it wouldn't get gas stains also oil too. thats about it on the chemicals as far as abrasion it does hold up a lot better than paint.
 

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A sincere thanks for the answers.
Next time I get an Eastwood e-mail "special offer", Guess what I'm finally going to invest in :-D
And a used oven of course. Which brings up one more question: does the curing process smell very much? What I mean is, the garage is already stuffed with tools. If I place the oven in the basement (with some ventilation) will the smell be bad enough to bring on the wrath of my wife?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
the smell from the curing process is not too bad but it is noticable, the worst part is the prep bake to get all the stuff out of the metal if it is pretty old or was covered in stuff before it will get a little smoky.
 
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