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87 Caballero Amarillo, original 305/200-4R, QJ
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Going to depend on multiple factors like how much work they'll have to do to get to the floor pan. It'll be far cheaper if they don't have to remove the seats, carpet, padding, seatbelts, garbage etc. Also depends on who is doing the work and the level of expectation you have. Quicky overlay patch or concourse replacement.

There's a weld shop literally right down the street that'd do that much cheaper than a boutique body shop, but I'd expect a far better job from the boutique, that'll include some sort of protectant applied and not leaving the bare metal etc.

Also depends on the parts, is it just a half pan or full pan, are you supplying the parts or will they have to order them, any particular places or parts that are taboo etc.

I got hit in my GMC years ago. Not only did I take the truck to the GM body shop, I also insisted on GM factory replacement parts. The insurance company did not like that because it doubled the cost of the repair, aftermarket cheapo Chinese parts costing much less, but my argument was its a GMC not a Toyota, so no Chinese aftermarket parts thank you.

So for you, could cost $300 or $3000, or anywhere in between. The less they have to do, the better your chances of haggling the price down a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Going to depend on multiple factors like how much work they'll have to do to get to the floor pan. It'll be far cheaper if they don't have to remove the seats, carpet, padding, seatbelts, garbage etc. Also depends on who is doing the work and the level of expectation you have. Quicky overlay patch or concourse replacement.

There's a weld shop literally right down the street that'd do that much cheaper than a boutique body shop, but I'd expect a far better job from the boutique, that'll include some sort of protectant applied and not leaving the bare metal etc.

Also depends on the parts, is it just a half pan or full pan, are you supplying the parts or will they have to order them, any particular places or parts that are taboo etc.

I got hit in my GMC years ago. Not only did I take the truck to the GM body shop, I also insisted on GM factory replacement parts. The insurance company did not like that because it doubled the cost of the repair, aftermarket cheapo Chinese parts costing much less, but my argument was its a GMC not a Toyota, so no Chinese aftermarket parts thank you.

So for you, could cost $300 or $3000, or anywhere in between. The less they have to do, the better your chances of haggling the price down a bit.
Thanks Kara, I’m asking because I’m looking at a car that needs these thing.
 

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87 Caballero Amarillo, original 305/200-4R, QJ
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Oh. Those repairs are cosmetic, as such, and not all that important in the big scheme, but if buying in that state, it's common practice to over exaggerate their real importance. What's really important is the bones. How is the frame, how's the mechanical. Is the car otherwise solid. Is it otherwise worth the asking price. A fender is nothing, couple bolts and replace the whole thing. A rusted floorboard on passenger side has several causes, most times it's as simple as negligence on the part of the owner, there's a water drain on that side behind the blower that can get clogged, and when the drain fills, it leaks through the heater box. Or is it the heater core leaking. Floorpans don't rot by themselves, the water gotta come from somewhere. So that can be taken into consideration with the asking price.

When you sell a car, you essentially sell the new owner all of your issues, but by the same token, buying a used car you inherit all the prior owners issues, better to have a clear understanding of what those are beforehand, or you'll buy a $2500 car that you'll then need to sink $10k into just to make it safe, comfortable and roadworthy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh. Those repairs are cosmetic, as such, and not all that important in the big scheme, but if buying in that state, it's common practice to over exaggerate their real importance. What's really important is the bones. How is the frame, how's the mechanical. Is the car otherwise solid. Is it otherwise worth the asking price. A fender is nothing, couple bolts and replace the whole thing. A rusted floorboard on passenger side has several causes, most times it's as simple as negligence on the part of the owner, there's a water drain on that side behind the blower that can get clogged, and when the drain fills, it leaks through the heater box. Or is it the heater core leaking. Floorpans don't rot by themselves, the water gotta come from somewhere. So that can be taken into consideration with the asking price.

When you sell a car, you essentially sell the new owner all of your issues, but by the same token, buying a used car you inherit all the prior owners issues, better to have a clear understanding of what those are beforehand, or you'll buy a $2500 car that you'll then need to sink $10k into just to make it safe, comfortable and roadworthy.
Thanks, I agree with you. I don’t mind paying top dollar for top shelf. I’m doing my homework so to make a fair offer.
 

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Around here, its $100 per hour for shop labor rates and I will predict 12-14 hours or maybe a little more to do that job if equipped with the correct tools. But as advised, make it easy for them and remove the seats and carpet, etc. Leave the drive shaft tunnel uncut and leave some metal to weld to at the sides of the pan.

For replacement metal, I recommend doing this as a two piece job because one large floor pan is very unwieldy inside the passenger compartment.

I hope this person has a lot of spot weld removing drill bits.

And please point out for whoever does this work to not cut through the floor support braces. These need to be located first from below by drilling holes in the pan metal as an outline shape of where each brace runs.

Rick

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Around here, its $100 per hour for shop labor rates and I will predict 12-14 hours or maybe a little more to do that job if equipped with the correct tools. But as advised, make it easy for them and remove the seats and carpet, etc. Leave the drive shaft tunnel uncut and leave some metal to weld to at the sides of the pan.

For replacement metal, I recommend doing this as a two piece job because one large floor pan is very unwieldy inside the passenger compartment.

I hope this person has a lot of spot weld removing drill bits.

And please point out for whoever does this work to not cut through the floor support braces. These need to be located first from below by drilling holes in the pan metal as an outline shape of where each brace runs.

Rick

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
Thanks Rick,
You know, 25 years ago I would have said , duh! Of course who would cut the support!!
After seeing the skill level in todays shops I completely agreed with you . Lol
This says it all !!!!!!!
Muscle Car Lovers
 

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Had a shop helper once who wanted to know torque for a certain bolt.

Being the smart arse that I am, I told him to tighten until it broke then back off a quarter turn.

A couple minutes later he comes up and says it broke, now what.

Note that this was at a Chevy dealership with all torque specs available.

Yes, they live among us.
 

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On today's car's 1/4 replacment is 14-18 book hours depending on make/model. No reason a EC 1/4 wouldn't be the same. 8-10 hours for the floor. YIKES $100 a hour for body labor sounds excessive, $55 around here but close to $75 at restoration shops. Don't forget paint and materials, you'll be surprised what all that cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
On today's car's 1/4 replacment is 14-18 book hours depending on make/model. No reason a EC 1/4 wouldn't be the same. 8-10 hours for the floor. YIKES $100 a hour for body labor sounds excessive, $55 around here but close to $75 at restoration shops. Don't forget paint and materials, you'll be surprised what all that cost.
Thanks Osh, that is exactly what I’m looking for. Eventually I’ll get the whole car painted. It’s faded black now so black primer till I raise the money isn’t the end of the world.
 
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