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ok, it's been about 10 yrs, but i helped (read as 'did it all') replace the wheel cylider on a g body - the thing i remember most was how i invented a few new curse words getting that (stupid idea) retaining clip off the cylinder.

my question is: has a new tool been invented, or an easy method thought of, to replace that cylinder in the last few years, or do i just resign myself to skinned up knuckels and new curse words? i have a driver side leaker
 

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New tool

All the manuals recommend using two awls. What ever they are. I do not even own one awl much less two. So I used two long skinny finishing nails. I pushed them in with my fingers, then tapped them in all the way with a small hammer. Then had to wiggle the wheel cylinder off. But, I had the rear end out off the car, so it was easy. Do not know how this would work with the rear end in place. Wheel cylinders were cheaper than rebuild kit at NAPA. Go figure.

Harris
 

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I recently had my rear brake shoes & wheel cylinders,along with my front brake pads & rubber brake lines (2 front)(1 rear) replaced by a friend who is a professional mechanic (in my driveway).He had a real hard time removing the old cylinders & installing the new ones.He broke the new clips & had to use the old ones.Wern't easy.Last time I did this was in 1978 on my 1969 Elky on all 4 wheels.If I remember correctly they just had 2 small bolts that held the cylinder to the backing plates.I'm glad I let him do it,it saved me a lot of aggravation.You aren't alone Ed.It is not an easy job.
 

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Haha I hate them things. Use two files and jam the pointy end that goes in the handle part in between the clip and the wheel cylinder. Seemed to work pretty good for me. I could ask the snap on guy next saturday if they have a tool to remove that if you want.
 

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I recently had my rear brake shoes & wheel cylinders,along with my front brake pads & rubber brake lines (2 front)(1 rear) replaced by a friend who is a professional mechanic (in my driveway).He had a real hard time removing the old cylinders & installing the new ones.He broke the new clips & had to use the old ones.Wern't easy.Last time I did this was in 1978 on my 1969 Elky on all 4 wheels.If I remember correctly they just had 2 small bolts that held the cylinder to the backing plates.I'm glad I let him do it,it saved me a lot of aggravation.You aren't alone Ed.It is not an easy job.
To install them I just took a large socket that fit snugly around the wheel cylinder,you can also use a small piece of pipe with the proper diameter. Put the clip on the wheel cylinder, put the pipe/socket over it,hold the wheel cylinder with a piece of wood wedged in between the cylinder and the axle hub, hit it with a hammer. Works every time. Also regarding the NAPA rebuild kits, the new ones you buy for like 10 bucks a piece are JUNK castings. My old ones fit fine, nice and snug. 1 of the 2 new ones fit OK, and one was really loose, I even swapped the old one and the other new one to the other side and they all fit snug. Ended up making a spacer out of one of the old clips by just grinding the tabs off and it fit fine. I normally just pry them out with 2 awls, or something equivalently pointy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks fellas - i'm considering just rebuilding the ones i have so as not to take the old ones out. the pistons are probably fine; new o rings and seals should do it do it.

i stopped rebuilding wheel cylinders when i was still in the navy - you could buy a pair of new GM wheel cylinder for less than $10 then.
 

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Yes those clips cause cursing ED. Curved needle nose pliers will work if you have the right sized pair. Some use those funny little tools that you open with screws, but they are hard to keep in position. I'm gonna consider looking for some backing plates from an S10 that the cylinders bolt on before I have to do it again.

Getter done before Monday!

:beer:
 

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There is a tool for that job....if i could figure out how to post a pic, i would........
When my son graduated UTI, and I showed him this tool, and of course his comment was "Whats that??"
 

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Yes those clips cause cursing ED. Curved needle nose pliers will work if you have the right sized pair. Some use those funny little tools that you open with screws, but they are hard to keep in position. I'm gonna consider looking for some backing plates from an S10 that the cylinders bolt on before I have to do it again.

Getter done before Monday!

:beer:
Hey Randy,that friend of mine I was referring to is our friend Charles,a very good mechanic but those little buggers gave him a fit.Charles & my son Scott put a 350 LT1 in Scott's 95 Caprice police interceptor a couple weeks ago.So Charles is keeping buzy & is in demand.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There is a tool for that job....if i could figure out how to post a pic, i would........
When my son graduated UTI, and I showed him this tool, and of course his comment was "Whats that??"

i'd like to see that !! can you email pics?
 

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i use the snap on tool for the radiator hoses. its a tool that looks like an awl with about 1 in of the end bent at a 90 . works pretty good
 

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awls are ice picks. Either those or 90* needle nose pliers.
 

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And X2 on the large socket to install the new clip. As I recall, just hit the socket with any hammer you can fit in the working space, and the clip engages. I seem to recall jamming the new wheel cylinder in it's proper position with a hammer handle wedged between the axle flange and the unfastened wheel cylinder before installing the retaining clip.:nanawrench:
 
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