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Getting ready to do a little wire work due to the two traffic stops in two weeksfor some lights being out. Went to replace the lights today new lights wouldn't work so I checked voltages and had nothing. Took a closer look at the wiring only to realize that there are a few bundles were there are three or four wires crimped together with no insulation to protect them from shorting with other bundles and and the frame.

Just thought I'd see if you guys have any pointers for me before I dig into this.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
much cheaper then painless or anything else ive seen. i was actually planning on just trying to find a fuse block out of a junkyard and wiring it myself untill you posted that. any experience with that company?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i think it just moved up my list! lemme know how it goes when you get around to it!! :You_Rock:
 

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I think I want to use them when I rip into mine and rewire it. I wonder how the factory guage, dome light, cig lighter, radio and all the other stuff matches up. Looks like a good setup
 

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How did this job go? I have the rebel wire 21 circut. I'm moving along slowly. All the wires are labeled every 6 inches and that has been a great help. A lot of them are the same or close as the original colors on my 77.
 

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Matty has my elkie and is selling it for me. health problems prevent me from even working on it anymore.

Be sure and take pics and keep us posted on your progress, rewiring is a fairly common issue with elkies, especially 5th gens.

It seems that GM put a special coating on the 5th gen wiring systems that attract idiots and people that shouldn't be allowed to play with wire cutters.

:dontknow:
 

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Yeah, they must have started using that coating on the last of the 4th gens. I got it all over me.
 

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Haven't personally heard of rebel brand OR did an entire vehicle system electrical swap, but there are quality differences in the grades of wire used & connectors between brands. Cheaper wire definitely won't handle heat as well as oem stuff. Also these universal kits are just that, even the better ones are a time consuming chore . Without decent electrical skill & attention to detail, a kit is not a cure all.

Whether or not you decide to get a kit & redo all your wiring or not, your existing wiring sounds like it can really benefit from some simple inspection & proper repair of unproper repairs. While twisting & soldering splices is one of the best methods,Just properly stripping wire ends without damaging actual wire, properly twisting , & properly tightly taping each connection with quality tape like 3m, then taping & wrapping all needed areas can have a nice lifespan compared to some idiot repair.

Heat shrink tubing is a nice addition to a splice. Personally I many times shy away from crimp connectors on splices. If they're cheap quality & so is your crimper tool, it's likely to fail.
When common sense inspecting wiring, grounds & grounding points are as important as anything.Clean mounting points are good along with a decent fastner that won't work loose. Be sure any new wires run through metal have a grommet, something like a tach wire shorting out can kill numerous ignition parts before you figure it out.
I don't think very many of us enjoy wiring, we just need to be good enough to make it properly do it's job & get on with the rest of our lives.:beer:
 

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Another problem with crimp connectors is corrosion.I've had to redo way to many "legacy" crimps where the conductor actually corroded away at the splice.They're not real weathertite,even with a pound and a half of tape wrapped around them.Soldering and shrink wrapping the splice seals it good.Odds are you'll never have to touch it again.....and it sure looks professional.

1st thing I do when I get into a vehicles electrical system is unwrap all the tape and redo whatever junction it hid.2nd thing is to replace or redo all the crimp connections (usually in the cabin) that aren't taped.Those little steps corrected a lot of issues,some I wasn't even aware of yet.
 

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The trick to using crimp connectors (if you have to) or any wiring that will be exposed to the weather (bikes, trailers, boats, etc) is once you have twisted, soldered, and used shrink tubing on the connection, cover the whole connection with a coat of RTV . On bikes, boats, and trailers, this not only waterproofs it, but if you cover the wire with RTV for about an inch out from the connection, it also absorbs vibrations, so the wire won't jiggle/shake/vibrate and end up breaking off.

There are several Harleys and 3 boat trailers running around Illinois that I did this way in the early 90s, and they still haven't had a wiring problem.

Ya gotta have smart brains man!

:nanawrench:
 

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You're right JL. In my case anyhow. I get impatient thinking something is not working until i break it to find out that it was working and something else was wrong. Like one bad ground on a loose sheet metal screw in the firewall:???:
 
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