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Discussion Starter #21
Not much progress today. I had to go out of town for a few hours which didn’t leave me much garage time. Flywheel and offset dowels will hopefully be here tomorrow. Today I managed to whack the perch off of the transmission crossmember and weld it on about 1 1/2” lower so my angles would be correct. Luckily, since I moved the perch I was able to use some stock holes on the frame rails for the crossmember. Now the transmission and bellhousing are both back out and I hope to start on putting the trans tunnel back together tomorrow.
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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Today I pulled off the job that I was dreading the most. I cut the tunnel out and welded in the new raised tunnel. I snuck up on my cuts which took me probably an extra hour. Once I was satisfied with the fit I fired up the welder. Then I quickly realized that my 60 year old body with a half dozen orthopedic surgeries in the bag wasn’t really up to the contortions necessary to get close enough to see my welds going down. I moved to the underside of the car to try it from there. Easier, but I forgot just how much fun it was to weld overhead. Luckily only about a dozen globs of molten metal landed on me during this process.

Anyway, as bad as my welds look, they do cover the entire perimeter of the new tunnel. I wasn’t overly concerned with the appearance, but I’ve definitely reached a new low here. But they looked great once I smeared seam sealer all over them.

On a side note, my offset dowels showed up so I can fix my bellhousing runout issue. Also, my local driveshaft shop knocked out my shortening/balancing job in just a few hours so I’ve got that back. Sadly, no flywheel knocked on my door.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Slow day. I spent most of it helping a friend put a new floor shifter & console in his Chevelle. But when I got home I mustered just enough motivation to fab up and weld in the mounting brackets for my future center console. Just a couple of straps welded to the tunnel with a pair of 1/4-20 nut-serts in each one.
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Discussion Starter #32
Today was a light catch-up day. The only thing I did related to the transmission swap was to add a pedal stop under the clutch pedal so it would have a solid end to its travel. I did the same for the accelerator pedal. I’ve always thought it best to have a solid accelerator pedal stop so I could get a full throttle opening without the possibility of overstressing any of the linkage or the throttle blade shafts.

I’ve not been happy with the fuel pump mount that I made when I installed the Sniper system a few months ago so I added some bracing to that. It’s now solid. I also took care of an issue that has bugged me for quite a while. Ever since switching from the bench seat to the bucket seats I’ve found it annoying to have to use wrenches both inside and under the car to secure/remove the inboard seat mount bolts. So while I had my welder fired up I welded some 5/16” flanged nuts to some thick washers then welded all four of those to the underside of the floor. Now when I want to remove or install the seats I can unbolt all four corners from inside the car.

Anyway: here are my high-tech one dollar pedal stops:
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Discussion Starter #33
I spent today waiting for my flywheel to show up and it finally did so at about 3 this afternoon. My plan was to have it match-balanced to the flexplate that I removed but the machine shop convinced me to save my $$$ for now and just try it first. My flexplate showed zero signs of having been modified during the initial balancing process. The machinist said that in his experience the flywheel balance will match up out of the box since both are stock externally-balanced units. So I came back home and put things together. At this rate I may very well be driving it tomorrow.
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Discussion Starter #34
I forgot to add that the .007 offset dowel pins brought my bellhousing alignment to within .003.
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Can you give me the source for instructions you used to check your bell housing offset? And, where did you get that plate? I don't understand the process for checking this process with a T56.

I installed a T56 Magnum in my Bel Air 10 years ago and bought a QuickTime bell housing and didn't check the offset.
It has been perfect in the 12K miles I've put on it since then.

When I received the bell, I was puzzled how it would be possible to check the offset on it since the back side opening on the bell isn't even a machined surface. I called them and they said there is no procedure for checking it and that I didn't need to because of the high precision they use during manufacturing. I guess things have changed in 10 years.
 

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wtg A
lookin goood

just in case, don't forget the LUBE..
I really like those dowel pins, nice trick..

back in the old days i'd just put the jack under the trans so its not hanging
on the bolts and clutch / input shaft when I nail it down tight..
I helped install a scatter shield and they checked everything, but that was yrs ago..

don't know nuttin about the Tremec..
are they dowel-ed to the bell housing also ??
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Can you give me the source for instructions you used to check your bell housing offset? And, where did you get that plate? I don't understand the process for checking this process with a T56.

I installed a T56 Magnum in my Bel Air 10 years ago and bought a QuickTime bell housing and didn't check the offset.
It has been perfect in the 12K miles I've put on it since then.

When I received the bell, I was puzzled how it would be possible to check the offset on it since the back side opening on the bell isn't even a machined surface. I called them and they said there is no procedure for checking it and that I didn't need to because of the high precision they use during manufacturing. I guess things have changed in 10 years.
The index plate is made by QuickTime. Some folks just take the front plate off of their T-56 And use that to index the bell. I didn’t feel like pulling the front off of a brand new transmission and risking creating a leak if I didn’t get it properly resealed. Once you bolt this plate on you check the runout just like you would on a “regular” bellhousing.

Upon initial assembly on the stock dowels I was showing .0055 off center which is just outside the acceptable limit. My .007 offset pins brought it down and left so I was now .003 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
wtg A
lookin goood

just in case, don't forget the LUBE..
I really like those dowel pins, nice trick..

back in the old days i'd just put the jack under the trans so its not hanging
on the bolts and clutch / input shaft when I nail it down tight..
I helped install a scatter shield and they checked everything, but that was yrs ago..

don't know nuttin about the Tremec..
are they dowel-ed to the bell housing also ??
The Tremec does index to the bell housing with dowel pins. Everything was very precisely machined so that, once aligned, everything just slid right into place without any interference.

The guy at Modern Driveline told me that a shortcut to indexing the bellhousing is to put the yoke in the transmission while it’s out of the car. Shift it into fourth then start turning the yoke to get familiar with how it feels and how much effort it takes to turn it. Then mount the transmission without the clutch installed and spin the yoke again. If the resistance doesn’t change you’re good. If it gets more difficult you’ve got an alignment issue to address.
 

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The Tremec does index to the bell housing with dowel pins. Everything was very precisely machined so that, once aligned, everything just slid right into place without any interference.
The guy at Modern Driveline told me tat a shortcut to indexing the bellhousing is to put the yoke in the transmission while it’s oil of the car. Shift it into fourth then start turning the yoke to get familiar with how it feels and how much effort it takes to turn it. Then mount the transmission without the clutch installed and spin the yoke again. If the resistance doesn’t change you’re good. If it gets more difficult you’ve got an alignment issue to address.
Yup, things have change in 10 years.
So what is installed onto the rear of your crank that extends out so you can measure the bell runout? It sure looked like a tight fit to get your dial indicator inside the hole.

I wonder if the guy at Modern really knows what he is talking about. It sure would be easier to do it the way he says. I have a 1/4" drive torque wrench that goes all the way down to 1 in. lb. that would be perfect for measuring what it would take to move the tranny yoke. I bought that torque wrench specifically for when it's needed to replace a pinion seal. Can remove the rear brakes and measure what it takes to move the axles and then duplicate that torque when re-tightening the pinion nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Yup, things have change in 10 years.
So what is installed onto the rear of your crank that extends out so you can measure the bell runout? It sure looked like a tight fit to get your dial indicator inside the hole.

I wonder if the guy at Modern really knows what he is talking about. It sure would be easier to do it the way he says. I have a 1/4" drive torque wrench that goes all the way down to 1 in. lb. that would be perfect for measuring what it would take to move the tranny yoke. I bought that torque wrench specifically for when it's needed to replace a pinion seal. Can remove the rear brakes and measure what it takes to move the axles and then duplicate that torque when re-tightening the pinion nut.
Yeah... my thought was that I’d be unlikely to be so lucky. I also thought of an inch Lb. wrench had I chosen that route. Mostly I just didn’t want to have to hoist the transmission into place any more times than necessary, as 135 Lbs. isn’t fun for me any more. As it was, I did need to use the offset pins so I’m glad that I just did it.

There is barely enough room for me to attach a magnetic base to the end of the crank and contort the angles to get it set. A little bigger hole would certainly have been a nice feature.
 
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