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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got my '79 back on the road at the end of last season after not driving it for almost 7 years due to a random (fuel starvation?) issue that would leave me stranded and in need of a tow back home. (I replaced the fuel pump, filter, injectors, gaskets and also replaced and properly mounted the coil, along with putting in new plugs and plug wires while I was replacing the injectors - plus I fixed the leaky air shocks by installing all new air shocks and a new filler kit) I drove it to work and back a half-dozen times before winter reared it's ugly head with snow at the end of October last year and did not get stranded one time so I think the problem's fixed.
I've always kept a 8-1/2 X 18 inch plastic toolbox behind the driver's seat with tools to wrench on it if the need came up while I was on the road. Back in 2000 when I originally bought the vehicle, that tool box contained pretty much all the tools I owned. 20 years later and I have a lot more tools in the basement.

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I like the little plastic tool box with the little plastic tray as it's covered with a bunch of cool gearhead-themed stickers (Summit, Richmond, B&M, Energy Suspension, Detroit Speed Shop, etc) and I am looking for what other El Camino owners keep in their tool boxes.
I have a cool Popular Mechanics 3/8" ratchet with a flexible head and a removable handle so it can get in tight spaces and I was planning on including that but should I keep a full set of standard and metric sockets in there as well or just what I think I might need? Should I try to fit 1/2" drive and 1/4" drive ratchet & sockets as well? Hammer? Rubber Mallet? Screwdrivers/Torx drivers? Allen wrench sets? Multi-meter? I know if I ever break down on a road trip I'll be missing the one tool I didn't think to include but it would be nice to have a good base-line idea and also any brilliant ideas from anyone who had just the tool they needed when they needed it.
Thanks in advance for any responses and suggestions.
FYI it's a '79 El Camino with a TPI 305/700R4 from an '89 IROC Camaro for the drivetrain. I also have a large milk crate in the back with jumper cables, oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, antifreeze and another bucket with cleaning supplies for when I bring it to a car show.
 

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Director Region 6 (FL) - 2017 Founders' Award Reci
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Flashlight, blade, strong tape, zip ties, copy of your AAA card.
Sounds like you have the tool box figured out . I drive alot of miles from the Florida Keys up to the mainland for El Camino get togethers and carry most of the items you listed . While they are not tools , I also carry a few spare parts . I try to keep my 87 in good road worthy condition but carry an extra upper and lower radiator hose , clamps , four feet of rubber fuel line , clamps as well as extra v-belts and my new No Co battery jump kit . My most important tool is like Old Bear suggested , my AAA card .
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I also have a spare V-belt in the milk crate in the back. The TPI motor was originally a serpentine belt drive but the A/C compressor and cast aluminum mount from the donor IROC was damaged in a rollover. The original 200 cu. in. V6 was a 90º motor and the crank pulley, alternator mount, power steering pump and v-belt bolted up to the TPI 305 with very few modifications needed.
I like the idea of keeping spare radiator hoses in the back, too. Of course, my upper hose is actually two hoses and a washing machine hose coupler in order to get from the radiator to the thermostat housing and yet fit around the pieced together air intake hose. (thanks to JTR publishing for their book on installing that TPI motor in many vehicles, including S-10s, Jaguar XJs and the GM G-body) When I needed my hoses I just mocked up what I needed with metal coat-hangers, went to the local Car-Quest and they let me behind the counter and I found what I needed in like 2 minutes. I was so excited when I got home and everything fit that I didn't even think about saving the wrap-around labels with the part numbers.
So I wouldn't have a clue what I would need for hoses. Oops.:oops:
 

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When I needed my hoses I just mocked up what I needed with metal coat-hangers, went to the local Car-Quest and they let me behind the counter and I found what I needed in like 2 minutes. I was so excited when I got home and everything fit that I didn't even think about saving the wrap-around labels with the part numbers.
So I wouldn't have a clue what I would need for hoses. Oops.:oops:
well, Cra-Quest is owned by Advance Auto. you can always create new bent wires, goto Advance and match them up, then write down the hose #'s. alternatively, has flex hose ever gotten over the bad rap it earned? (or is it still a bad thing?)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well, Cra-Quest is owned by Advance Auto. you can always create new bent wires, goto Advance and match them up, then write down the hose #'s. alternatively, has flex hose ever gotten over the bad rap it earned? (or is it still a bad thing?)
I remember checking for the flex hoses back in 2001 when I was getting everything worked out with my engine swap. As I recall, they were either too short, the wrong diameter, or both for my application. I was able to get a single-piece lower hose the correct diameter, length and bend radius. But the upper one was tricky. I don't even remember how I stumbled upon the washing machine hose coupler idea (this was before I had even dial-up internet available where I lived) but I was able to make it work by finding two separate hoses with the correct bends and diameters to fit into the upper radiator outlet, the coupler, and the thermostat housing which were all different diameters if I recall correctly..
Here's a photo of the upper hose snaking under the TPI air intake and how I got it all to fit together under the Mass Airflow Sensor.
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