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Discussion Starter #1
I recently got 1972 El Camino with 5-speed T5 transmission. Car used to be automatic, but previous owner swapped automatic transmission with T5.

He pointed that he couldn't install a proper transmission mount (between crossmember and transmission), and instead, he inserted peace of the tire rubber. He explained that there was not enough space for the mount to fit in. The crossmember is the old one that was installed when transmission was automatic (I think he just moved it to proper place).

I drove about 40 miles to bring the car to my home and during that time I didn't have any issues shifting. It felt pretty good.
I parked in the garage and I noticed that his hand made rubber mount totally fell apart, and I also noticed that transmission is leaking a little bit.

Questions:
1) I looked online for crossmember and found only this one that maybe could work: http://www.elcaminostore.com/el-camino-crossmember-racing-or-high-horse-power-applications-1968-1972.html
Does anybody know if this is what I need?

2) Let's say I buy this crossmember and it fits, where do I find a proper mount?

3) What is the correct way to replace a crossmember? I've never done something like that. I am thinking to try to support transmission with leveling jack, then to try to remove old crossmembmer and install new one. Would that be correct? Anything I should be worried about?

Thanks
 

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Many times things need to be modified on non factory swaps. There is more than 1 case version of t-5 & bellhousings, & have some variables in it. Many t-5's came mounted at an angle not straight up & down as viewed from rear. No guarantee an aftermarket crossmember will just bolt up as needed with correct geometry.
One common problem with installing larger longer transmissions in older vehicles is lack of trans tunnel room, which puts the tail lower, which also makes the drivetrain angle incorrect & can cause highway vibrations. First step may be to check drive shaft angles. Tremec now has a phone app to do this.

There are several common available gm mounts which may work or make work.

Also no good reason to have a leaky manual trans. Need to clean it & determine where leaks are from . Most common areas are bolt on shifter not sealed, speedo gear outlet, tailshaft seal & being overfilled.

May be helpful to know what year & vehicle t-5 came from.
 

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Here is a link that may help you identify the T5 transmission in your vehicle. You should be able to find a tag or numbers stamped on the left side of the case. I have a T5 in my 64 El Camino and as the other member commented it is mounted on the crossmember at an angle. I'll try to get a photo of it posted for you later. This will identify almost every T5 application that exists.

http://www.britishv8.org/articles/borg-warner-t5-id-tags.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I'll look into what version of T5 I have and I will post it here. I think it is from Camaro 94 or 95, but not 100% sure. Transmission doesn't look like it is under any angle. The owner also mentioned that when he was explaining the work he did. When I look under, I can only see drive shaft under the angle.. like in the picture (the correct one) http://jniolon.clubfte.com/drivelinephasing/phasing.jpg

I hoped to have a proper crossmember and mount before I take car to local transmission mechanic to address the leaks. I believe that any of them can fix leaking problem, but I don't think they will want to figure out what crossmember/mount I need. I am also looking for good mechanics that knows about these old cars in my area (San Antonio).

Thanks
 

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Pretty sure Melissa is correct on that.
94 or 95 v-8 would be the t-56 that sat behind an LT1
If you can drive as fast as you ever go without complaints of vibration, then angle should be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I lifted transmission about 1 inch up and I was able to remove crossmember and all rubber pieces that original owner placed instead of the real mount.

The space (between crossmember and transmission) was around 1 inch.

I picked up new mount in auto zone "Performance Transmission Mount For G.M. RWD Cars & 2WD Trucks" (Part No. 3.1108G). http://contentinfo.autozone.com/znetcs/product-info/en/US/egs/3.1108G/image/3/
The part has all holes on right places and looks like prefect fit for my transmission, and now that transmission is lifted about 2 inches I can even install it. But, now I am worried if transmission is in the right place since I lifted it 1 more inch up or it doesn't matter?

Can somebody shed some light to me.. Thanks
 

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You are changing the driveshaft angle by raising and lowering the tranny. If you are still not hitting the floor and have about a 1/2" to 1" clearance you are probably in the ballpark. Front u joint should have a slight down angle on to shaft.
Many ways to measure including some phone apps which should be done to make sure you are right and won't have driveline vibrations.
 

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finding driveline angle? There's an app for that!!

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Tremec.tremec.app&hl=en

Description
The TREMEC Toolbox will help you simplify driveline setup, predict the effects of changing gear ratios and tire size, and calculate vehicle speed and RPM variables. This Toolbox is great for planning your rig, allowing you to see what kind of performance to expect from different combinations!
The TREMEC Toolbox contains:
• Driveline Angle Finder: Take the guesswork out of your chassis setup with this handy 3-step tool! By using your smartphone as a measuring device, the app will calculate each u-joint angle and provide an overall driveline operating angle with a Pass/Fail response. Designed for RWD vehicles equipped with a one-piece driveshaft.
• Vehicle Speed Calculator: Interactively determine your vehicle’s speed in any gear and any engine RPM for best performance. You can alter the axle gear ratio, the transmission gear ratio and tire size to see the impact in real-time. As an added bonus, the calculator doubles as a Gear Ratio Calculator.
• RPM Calculator: Determine what RPM your engine will run based on gear ratio, tire size, transmission and MPH. Try various combinations to come up with the best combination of gear ratio and tire size for your vehicle.
• Tire Size Calculator: Convert the funky P-Metric tire size (Example: 265/75R16) on the side of your tires to inches to simplify these drivetrain calculators!
 
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