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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little old paint removal, dent repairs and replacement of some rusted areas with new panels. The weather is holding and I'm getting more done than I expected. I need the warm weather to cure my fillers and primers. I should have it close to being ready for paint in the next few days. I'm probably going to wait for painting until I replace the V6 with a V8. Feeling good. 馃槑
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I'm trying not to get to carried away on a every day cruiser. I primed a few spots today and I'll sand them and then in a couple more days I'll prime the whole thing. After a final sanding it will be ready for new paint. I did body and paint work for about 30 years and then I worked on the railroad for the last 20 years. I seem to still remember quite a bit. I have tried to keep up with materials and techniques since I quit doing it full time.
 

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I thoroughly enjoy doing body work and painting. That's probably because I was not in the business full-time. I'm sure the cost of body filler and paint today vs eons ago is enough to make you choke.

As a hobby, nothing compares with standing back and admiring the finished project! I can't wait to see pictures of your painted Elky next week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Vehicle Car
in uh
What color are you going with?
Patrick
Dark gray metallic below the
What color are you going with?
Patrick
Dark gray metallic below the body line and stock silver above. This way I can paint the lower this fall, swap the V8 in and paint the top next spring. Then I'll look at it and decide if I want to do dark gray hood stripes.
 

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overspray, when you cut open the skinl behind the rear wheel, where the side marker light is located, did you find a wire attached to the inner panel? Another member and I have been wondering the necessity of this wire. The photo is in the thread below:


specifically, post #55
 

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If you haven't yet, I'd get a decent infared (IR) gun for checking metal temps. Screw in 250 watt infared heat bulbs are a cheap way of curing spots better & faster. I have some on a home made strip I can hang & 1 in an old large adjustable metal standing house fixture.. After materials initially flash , you can ramp up the heat higher. 120 to 150 is good, somewhere around 170 to 180 is where you risk bubbling material. I like using SPI epoxy, but has to maintain above 65 degrees for 1st approx 24 hours or it may never cure completely. Not having a garage or heated shop , IR heat is the key. Supposedly cures from inside out also.

Is that panelbond adhesive you're using for metal repairs? Strong schtuff. I haven't always had a mig & tig welder either. I'd make sure you don't have any bad high spots & use some sort of high tech fibered filler as a thick first coat to help keep it from shadowing later.

Do the hood stripes. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
overspray, when you cut open the skinl behind the rear wheel, where the side marker light is located, did you find a wire attached to the inner panel? Another member and I have been wondering the necessity of this wire. The photo is in the thread below:


specifically, post #55
Yes, there was a wire with square tabs spot welded inside the cavity on the inner panel. My guess is something to do with assembly alignment or to stack that particular piece on a pallet. I can't think of a particular function other than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you haven't yet, I'd get a decent infared (IR) gun for checking metal temps. Screw in 250 watt infared heat bulbs are a cheap way of curing spots better & faster. I have some on a home made strip I can hang & 1 in an old large adjustable metal standing house fixture.. After materials initially flash , you can ramp up the heat higher. 120 to 150 is good, somewhere around 170 to 180 is where you risk bubbling material. I like using SPI epoxy, but has to maintain above 65 degrees for 1st approx 24 hours or it may never cure completely. Not having a garage or heated shop , IR heat is the key. Supposedly cures from inside out also.

Is that panelbond adhesive you're using for metal repairs? Strong schtuff. I haven't always had a mig & tig welder either. I'd make sure you don't have any bad high spots & use some sort of high tech fibered filler as a thick first coat to help keep it from shadowing later.

Do the hood stripes. :p
I have looked at panel bond adhesive products since they first came out. I have researched but never tried them. They are expensive. I watched many videos and I found a guy that used J B Weld epoxy adhesive to bond panels. I have repaired everything from wood to engine blocks with J B Weld and it's never failed when done properly and it's quite reasonably priced. I flanged the panel to recess the the edge for a flush fit. I had to use a hammer and dolly on the front and rear ends. I did use some J B to cover the seam after bonding and the fit was very good, only a couple very small high spots which I contour filled and blocked. Before installing/bonding the panel, I sandblasted and brushed the inside rusty areas with a rust converter. After the panel was on and primed, I coated the inside with 3M cavity wax spray. I think I have it protected and the repair is very firm and strong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Kind of partial to your colors. 1st is the day I bought it. 2nd is after tires, wheel paint, and spoiler.
Tom View attachment 141295 View attachment 141299
Yes, that's the plan--love it. That is a nice looking truck!. I was thinking of doing the roof and upper quarters like yours, but I only found 1 of the mouldings I need--right side box panel. I still need the tailgate and left side box trim. There are only a couple Gen 5 el Caminos in the local junkyard.
 

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Just a bit of advice, drill those rivets out and fill the holes before the body filler goes on. Nothing wrong with panel bond and for a couple bucks more than jb weld that's what I would do just so I can sleep at night. JB weld has it's uses but bodywork isn't one of them.
 

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Cavity wax is great.
I agree the rivets are the worst part. If possible I would dimple or at least slightly countersink the holes to avoid a sharp edge.. Also this is definitely the time and place to have thicker than normal filler, as mentioned preferably a first layer of fiber reinforced product. I think it's 3-m that has a carbon fiber infused version a good painter of black show cars likes.

While this type of work would be 110 percent frowned upon on professional painting forums, it could remain a secret to most. I'm sure it was cleaned good, it's down low, not in the sun or in your face, & thick filler can hide a bunch of sins when done properly----as long as it doesn't get hit or flexed hard enough to crack it. We've all seen the tv shows where the professional thinks they got a pretty solid car that was last painted forever ago & gets all sorts of surprises. People hide their sins all the time.
While not the way I would do things these days, I grew up really poor & I am under a tight budget again now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just a bit of advice, drill those rivets out and fill the holes before the body filler goes on. Nothing wrong with panel bond and for a couple bucks more than jb weld that's what I would do just so I can sleep at night. JB weld has it's uses but bodywork isn't one of them.
I was going to drill the rivets out but I ground the heads off and filled the holes with more J B. This is kind of a test for me. The inside of the rivets are sealed and coated with the cavity wax. The only variable I have a slight concern with, is the temperature extremes here in North Dakota might let the dissimilar metals expand and contract at different rates and the riveted areas may telegraph that through the repair after a few heat and cold cycles. We can have up to 140 degree F difference throughout the 4 seasons.
 
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